The egg is the latest encouraging development in the slow recovery of the endangered birds in the regions they historically inhabited. The effort has been hampered by hunters and lead poisoning of the birds.
A female released in the park in 2004 and a male released the same year 30 miles west at Big Sur had been observed engaged in courtship behavior earlier this year, Carl Brenner, a park spokesman, said.
“They are now the proud parents of a small egg,” Mr. Brenner said.
Biologists confirmed the presence of the egg after hiking to the site on Friday."
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source:http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/10/us/10condor.html?ref=us


This photo provided by the National Park Service shows a nesting California condor on Friday, March 5, 2010, in a cranny near the High Peaks Trail in Pinnacles National Monument, Calif. Biologists at Pinnacles are celebrating the first condor egg laid by a mating pair in more than a century. Park spokesman Carl Brenner said a condor pair released in the park in 2004 at Big Sur had been observed engaged in courtship behavior earlier this year. "They are now the proud parents of a small egg," Brenner said. (AP Photo/National Park Service, John Maio)