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Thursday, February 26, 2009

Topalov wins World Chess Challenge

GM Veselin Topalov of Bulgaria won the seventh game of his match today to clinch the match by a score of 4.5-2.5. Topalov now moves on to play World Chess Champion Vishy Anand later in the year for the World Chess Championship Crown. Here is some analysis of game 7:


Topalov,V - Kamsky,G [C07]
World Chess Challenge Sofia BUL (7), 26.02.2009
[Deep Rybka 3,Zappa Mexico II]

Opening:French Defense:Tarrasch variation 1.e4 e6 French Defense 2.d4 d5 3.Nd2 Tarrasch variation 3...c5 The most popular continuation for Black. 4.exd5 Qxd5 [Analysis:More popular is 4...exd5 ] 5.Ngf3 cxd4 Winning a pawn. 6.Bc4 Winning a tempo for his pawn. 6...Qd6 The lost tempo. 7.0-0 Nf6 The most often played move, beginning to develop his minor pieces. 8.Re1 Centralizing his rook. 8...Be7 Preparing to castle on the kingside. 9.Nb3 The most often played move, creating a double-attack against Kamsky's d-pawn. 9...Nc6 [Analysis:Rarely played in this position is 9...0-0 ] 10.Nbxd4 Regaining his pawn and offering to exchange knights on d4. 10...Nxd4 [Analysis:Rarely played in this position is 10...0-0 ] 11.Nxd4 Regaining his piece. 11...0-0 [Analysis:The main line is: 11...a6 12.c3 0-0 13.Qf3 Qc7 14.Bb3 Bd6] 12.c3 Anchoring his knight. 12...Bd7 Completing the development of his minor pieces. 13.Qf3 The most popular continuation, attacking Kamsky's unprotected b-pawn winning a tempo. 13...Qb6N The lost tempo, however now Topalov's b-pawn is attacked which ties down Topalov's dark-squared bishop to defend this pawn.This move is a theoretical novelty for the position. 14.Bb3 Allowing him to develop his dark-squared bishop. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:Another idea is to play 14.Bf4 with a possible continuation being: 14...Qxb2 15.Rab1 Qa3 16.Rxb7 Rac8 17.Bb3 h6 18.Qe2 Rfd8 =] 14...a5 Threatening ....a4. 15.Be3 Threatening a discovered attack against Kamsky's queen. 15...Bc5 Double attacking Topalov's bishop. 16.Rad1 Centralizing his rook, which results in the overprotection of his knight. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 16.Rab1 e5 17.Nc2 Rac8 18.Bxc5 Qxc5 19.Ne3 a4 20.Bc2 a3 !? 21.bxa3 b5 22.a4 bxa4 23.c4 Bc6 24.Qg3 Nh5 25.Qh4 g6 =] 16...a4 Attacking Topalov's bishop, winning a tempo. 17.Bc2 [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:The program preferred to play 17.Bc4 with a possible continuation being: 17...Qxb2 18.Bh6 Bc6 (18...gxh6? 19.Qxf6+-) 19.Qg3 Nh5 20.Qh4 Ra5 21.Re5 Qxc3 22.Qxh5 Bxd4 23.Rxa5 gxh6 24.Qg4+ Bg7 =] 17...Qxb2 18.Bg5 Threatening 19.Bxf6 18...Nd5 Double-attacking Topalov's c-pawn. 19.c4 Threatening 20.cxd5 19...Bxd4 20.Qd3 Threatening the game ending 21.Qxh7 checkmate. 20...f5 21.Qxd4 Regaining his piece. 21...Qxc2 Regaining material equality. 22.cxd5 Qxa2 Going up two pawns in material. Deep Rybka evaluates that Topalov has a great deal of compensation for the pawns. 23.Qb6 Creating the threat of 24.Qxb7. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 23.Qb4 Rae8 24.Qxb7 Rf7 25.d6 Qb3 26.Qa7 Qb8 27.Qd4 Rc8] 23...a3 Advancing the passed pawn nearer to its queening square. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:Better is: 23...Rae8 24.Qxb7 Rf7 25.d6 Qb3 26.Qxb3 axb3 27.Be7 Rb8 28.f4 Bc6 29.Rd2 Bd5 30.Kf2 Rxe7 31.dxe7 Kf7 With sufficient compensation for the pawn.] 24.Be7?! Attacking Kamsky's rook. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:Better is 24.dxe6 Bc6 25.e7 Rfe8 26.Rd8 Qf7 27.Bc1 h6 28.f3 Kh7 =/+ (28...a2 29.Bb2 Kh7 30.Rxa8 Rxa8 31.Qd8 Ra4 -/+) ] 24...Rfe8-/+ Avoiding the loss of a tempo and instead winning one. Deep Rybka evaluates this position as -/+ 25.Qd6 Attacking Kamsky's bishop threatening to win a tempo. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:Better is 25.Qxb7 with a possible continuation being: 25...Ba4 26.Ra1 Qxd5 27.Qxd5 exd5 28.Rxa3 d4 29.Bb4 Rxe1+ 30.Bxe1 Re8 31.Bb4 Bc2 -/+] 25...Ba4 Attacking Topalov' s rook threatening to win it.By playing this move Kamsky gives back a pawn. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:Better is 25...Bc8 with a possible continuation being: 26.Qc7 Qb3 27.d6 a2 28.Bf6 Bd7 29.Bxg7 Kxg7 30.Qxd7+ Kg8 -/+] 26.Qxe6+ Winning a tempo.Deep Rybka 3 evaluates that Topalov has sufficient compensation for the pawn. 26...Kh8[] the only move 27.Ra1 Avoiding the loss of tempo and instead winning one by attacking Topalov's queen. 27...Qc4 The lost tempo, however now because the a2-square has been vacated, Kamsky can advance his a-pawn to this square. 28.Rec1 Attacking Kamsky's queen winning a tempo. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:Better is 28.Rxa3 Bb3 29.Rxa8 Rxa8 30.Qxf5 Qc3 31.Qe4 Ra1 32.Bb4 Rxe1+ 33.Qxe1 Qxe1+ 34.Bxe1 Bxd5 =] 28...Bc2 The lost tempo. 29.Qd7?! [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:Better is 29.Qe3 with a possible continuation being: 29...f4 30.Qc5 Qxc5 31.Bxc5 a2 32.Rxc2 Re1+ 33.Rxe1 a1Q 34.Rcc1 Qa4 =/+] 29...a2-/+ -/+ 30.d6? Anchoring his bishop.Now Topalov threatens to win a pawn via 31.Qxb7.However, the move 30.d6? is a mistake. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:Better is 30.Qxb7 Qd4 31.Qb4 Qxb4 32.Bxb4 Re4 33.Bc3 Bb3 34.d6 Kg8 35.f3 Rc4 36.Bb2 Rd8 37.Rxc4 Bxc4 -/+] 30...b5?! [Analysis:Better is 30...Qb3 with a possible continuation being: 31.Re1 Be4 32.h3 Rec8 33.Bg5 Qb2 34.Qe6 Re8 35.Rxa2 Qxa2 36.Qxa2 Rxa2 37.d7 Rf8 38.f3 Bc6 39.d8Q Rxd8 40.Bxd8 Kg8 =/+] 31.Qb7? A mistake. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:Better is: 31.Qc7 Qxc7 32.dxc7 Bb3 33.Bb4 Bc4 34.Rd1 Rac8 35.Rdc1 Kg8 (35...Rxc7 36.Rxa2 Kg8 (36...Bxa2 37.Rxc7 Kg8 38.Bc3 Bf7 39.Rb7 Rc8 40.Bb2 Rd8 41.h3 h6 with sufficient compensation for the pawn.) ) ] 31...Reb8? A mistake. [Analysis:Better is 31...b4 32.d7 Reb8 33.d8Q+ Rxd8 34.Qxb4 Qxb4 35.Bxb4 Rdb8 36.Bd2 Rb1 37.f3 Kg8 -+] 32.Qc7 Offering to exchange queens. 32...Rc8? A mistake. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:Better is 32...Bd3 with a possible continuation being: 33.Rxc4 bxc4 =/+ 34.h3 Rb1+ 35.Kh2 Rxa1 36.d7 Rh1+ 37.Kg3 f4+ 38.Kxf4 Rg8 39.d8Q a1Q 40.Bc5 Re1 41.Qxg8+ Kxg8 42.Qd8+ Kf7 43.Qd5+ Kg6 with sufficient compensation for the rook.] 33.Qxc4 Rxc4 34.d7 Threatening 35.d8 (Q)+- 34...Bb1 Threatening 35...Rxc1 mate [Analysis:Better is 34...Bb3 35.d8Q+ Rxd8 36.Bxd8 Kg8 37.Re1 Rd4 38.Bb6 Re4 39.Rxe4 fxe4 +-] 35.Rd1 [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: Better is 35.Rxc4 bxc4 36.Kf1 Kg8 37.d8Q+ Rxd8 38.Bxd8 c3 39.Ke1 Kf7 40.Kd1 Ke6 41.Kc1 c2 +-] 35...Kg8 36.d8Q+ Forcing Kamsky to give up his rook for Topalov's new queen. 36...Rxd8 37.Bxd8 Leaving Topalov up a minor piece in material. 37...Bc2 Attacking Topalov's rook threatening to win at least a tempo. 38.Rdc1 +/- The lost tempo,however now Kamsky's a-pawn is enprise. 38...b4?? Kamsky blunders a pawn. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II:Better is 38...Bb3 39.Re1 Re4 40.Ba5 Rxe1+ 41.Rxe1 Kf7 42.Bc3 g6 43.f3 Bc2 44.Bb4 h6 +-] 39.Rxa2 +- The lost pawn. 39...b3 Threatening 40...b2 followed by 42...b1(Q). 40.Ra8 Threatening a discovered check against Kamsky's king. 40...Kf7 [Analysis: 40...b2?? 41.Bf6+ Kf7 42.Bxb2 Rc7 +-] 41.Rb8 Preventing Kamsky from advancing his b-pawn. 41...Ke6 42.Re1+ [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II:Better is 42.Ra1 h6 43.f3 Rc6 44.Ra7 g6 45.Be7 Kd5 46.Bf8 h5 47.Rd8+ Ke6 48.Ba3 f4 49.Re8+ Kd5 50.Ra5+ Kc4 51.Ra4+ Kc3 52.Rxf4 b2 53.Bxb2+ Kxb2 +-] 42...Kd5 [42...Kd6 43.Bb6 b2 44.Be3 b1Q 45.Rbxb1 Bxb1 46.Rxb1 f4 47.Bd2 g5 +-] 43.Be7 [Analysis:Rybka 3: Better is: 43.Rb6 Rc6 44.Rb7 Ra6 45.Bg5 Kc6 46.Rb4 Kd5 47.Bd2 g6 48.Bc3 Ra7 49.Re5+ Kc6 50.f3 Rf7 +-] 43...Ra4 Threatening 44...Ra2 45....b2 46...b1(Q). 44.Bf8 Ra7 [44...Ra2 45.Bxg7 +-] 45.h4 Kamsky resigned. With this victory Topalov wins the match by a score of 4.5-2.5 and he will now face World Chess Champion Viswanathan Anand later in the year for the World Chess Championship. Congratulations to GM Topalov. 1-0

Women's Grand Prix to begin on March 20

The Women's Grand Prix chess event is going to begin in Istanbul on March 6,2009. The event runs until March 20th and includes these players:

GM Koneru, Humpy IND,elo 2621, GM Yifan,Hou CHN elo 2571, GM Antoaneta Stefanova elo 2557 BUL, GM Pia Cramling elo 2548 SWE, GM Maia elo 2516 GEO, GM Xue, Zhao CHN elo 2508, GM Chen,Zhu elo 2496 QTR, IM Elina Danielian 2496 ARM, WGM Yang,Shen elo 2448 CHN,WGM Mamedjarova, Zeinab elo 2362 AZE, WIM Yıldız, Betül Cemre elo 2214 TUR

Source:http://www.fide.com/component/content/article/1-fide-news/3786-press-release-fide-women-grand-prix-starts-in-istanbul

Final Standings:Aeroflot Open section A1:Bacrot wins on a tiebreak

Here are the final standings for the top A1 section at the Aeroflot Open. GM Etienne Bacrot of France won the top A1 section on a tie-break over GM Alexander Moiseenko of the Ukraine.Congratulations to both players!



Rank Name Flags Score Fed. M/F Rating TPR W-We Col.Bal. Rat-HiLo 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 GM Bacrot, Etienne 6.5 FRA M 2722 2775 +0.62 -1 2607.3 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1
2 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 6.5 UKR M 2676 2770 +1.11 1 2602.9 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1
3 GM Zhou, Jianchao 6.0 CHN M 2612 2753 +1.71 -1 2638.9 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½
4 GM Predojevic, Borki 6.0 BIH M 2650 2706 +0.64 -1 2571.1 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ ½
5 GM Zhigalko, Sergei 6.0 BLR M 2587 2765 +2.15 1 2655.4 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ ½
6 GM Kurnosov, Igor 6.0 RUS M 2602 2758 +1.89 1 2642.4 1 1 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 ½
7 GM Potkin, Vladimir 6.0 RUS M 2613 2748 +1.61 1 2626.6 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½
8 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 6.0 RUS M 2664 2743 +0.92 1 2610.3 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 0 1
9 GM Pashikian, Arman 6.0 ARM M 2621 2729 +1.29 1 2598.9 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 0
10 IM Yudin, Sergei 5.5 RUS M 2562 2706 +1.78 -1 2636.9 ½ 0 1 ½ 0 1 1 1 ½
11 GM Zhou, Weiqi 5.5 CHN M 2542 2714 +2.15 -1 2632.9 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 0
12 GM Filippov, Anton 5.5 UZB M 2556 2711 +1.94 -1 2631.9 0 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1
13 IM Kosintseva, Tatiana w 5.5 RUS F 2497 2702 +2.52 -1 2621.9 ½ ½ 0 1 1 ½ 1 ½ ½
14 GM Sargissian, Gabriel 5.5 ARM M 2677 2685 +0.10 1 2598.7 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½
15 GM Vitiugov, Nikita 5.5 RUS M 2687 2672 -0.18 1 2591.4 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 1
16 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 5.5 RUS M 2636 2665 +0.36 1 2571.6 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 1
17 GM Aleksandrov, Aleksej 5.5 BLR M 2636 2644 +0.10 1 2566.4 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½
18 GM Riazantsev, Alexander 5.5 RUS M 2634 2636 +0.03 1 2561.4 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½

Aeroflot Open Chess Tournament:section A1: Round 9 results

Here are the results from round 9 for the top A1 section at the Aeroflot Open Chess Tournament:

Pairings round 9 (Wednesday, 25 February 2009)

Table White Flags Score Fed. Rating Black Flags Score Fed. Rating Result
1 GM Pashikian, Arman 6.0 ARM 2621 GM Bacrot, Etienne 5.5 FRA 2722 0-1
2 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 5.5 UKR 2676 GM Zhou, Weiqi 5.5 CHN 2542 1-0
3 GM Kurnosov, Igor 5.5 RUS 2602 GM Predojevic, Borki 5.5 BIH 2650 ½-½
4 GM Zhigalko, Sergei 5.5 BLR 2587 GM Potkin, Vladimir 5.5 RUS 2613 ½-½
5 GM Sargissian, Gabriel 5.0 ARM 2677 GM Zhou, Jianchao 5.5 CHN 2612 ½-½
6 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 5.0 RUS 2664 GM Khairullin, Ildar 5.0 RUS 2574 1-0
7 GM Aleksandrov, Aleksej 5.0 BLR 2636 IM Kosintseva, Tatiana w 5.0 RUS 2497 ½-½
8 GM Riazantsev, Alexander 5.0 RUS 2634 IM Yudin, Sergei 5.0 RUS 2562 ½-½
9 GM Dyachkov, Sergej 4.5 RUS 2553 GM Dreev, Alexey 4.5 RUS 2688 ½-½
10 GM Vitiugov, Nikita 4.5 RUS 2687 GM Grigoriants, Sergey 4.5 RUS 2565 1-0
11 GM Ehlvest, Jaan 4.5 USA 2595 GM Amonatov, Farrukh 4.5 TJK 2647 ½-½
12 GM Wen, Yang 4.5 CHN 2504 GM Smirin, Ilia 4.5 ISR 2647 ½-½
13 GM Bareev, Evgeny 4.5 RUS 2645 GM Filippov, Anton 4.5 UZB 2556 0-1
14 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 4.5 RUS 2636 GM Safarli, Eltaj j 4.5 AZE 2564 1-0
15 GM Kazhgaleyev, Murtas 4.5 KAZ 2630 GM Ajrapetjan, Yuriy 4.5 UKR 2490 ½-½
16 GM So, Wesley j 4.5 PHI 2627 GM Andriasian, Zaven 4.5 ARM 2564 ½-½
17 GM Landa, Konstantin 4.5 RUS 2626 GM Kotsur, Pavel 4.5 KAZ 2563 ½-½
18 GM Zhigalko, Andrey 4.5 BLR 2572 GM Huzman, Alexander 4.5 ISR 2602 ½-½

Aeroflot Open Chess Tournament:Round 8 standings section A1

Here are the standings for the top section at the Aeroflot Open after 8 rounds of play:

Rank Name Flags Score Fed. M/F Rating TPR W-We Col.Bal. Rat-HiLo 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 GM Pashikian, Arman 6.0 ARM M 2621 2782 +1.65 0 2583.2 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1
2 GM Zhigalko, Sergei 5.5 BLR M 2587 2784 +2.11 0 2662.5 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½
3 GM Kurnosov, Igor 5.5 RUS M 2602 2772 +1.82 0 2641.2 1 1 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 0
4 GM Zhou, Jianchao 5.5 CHN M 2612 2763 +1.62 0 2632.5 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½
5 GM Zhou, Weiqi 5.5 CHN M 2542 2770 +2.47 0 2630.0 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1
6 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 5.5 UKR M 2676 2753 +0.79 0 2610.5 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½
7 GM Bacrot, Etienne 5.5 FRA M 2722 2749 +0.26 0 2605.0 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1
8 GM Predojevic, Borki 5.5 BIH M 2650 2720 +0.71 0 2566.0 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 ½
9 GM Potkin, Vladimir 5.5 RUS M 2613 2768 +1.65 2 2633.2 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1
10 GM Khairullin, Ildar 5.0 RUS M 2574 2718 +1.55 0 2639.7 0 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½
11 IM Yudin, Sergei 5.0 RUS M 2562 2720 +1.68 0 2637.3 ½ 0 1 ½ 0 1 1 1
12 IM Kosintseva, Tatiana w 5.0 RUS F 2497 2715 +2.33 0 2619.5 ½ ½ 0 1 1 ½ 1 ½
13 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 5.0 RUS M 2664 2718 +0.54 0 2616.3 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 0
14 GM Sargissian, Gabriel 5.0 ARM M 2677 2699 +0.19 0 2596.5 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½
15 GM Aleksandrov, Aleksej 5.0 BLR M 2636 2667 +0.29 0 2568.2 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ 1
16 GM Riazantsev, Alexander 5.0 RUS M 2634 2650 +0.13 0 2561.3 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½

Aeroflot Open Chess Tournament:results from Round 8 section A1

Here are the results for the top boards at the Aeroflot Open for round 8:

Table White Flags Score Fed. Rating Black Flags Score Fed. Rating Result
1 GM Pashikian, Arman 5.0 ARM 2621 GM Kurnosov, Igor 5.5 RUS 2602 1-0
2 GM Predojevic, Borki 5.0 BIH 2650 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 5.0 UKR 2676 ½-½
3 GM Zhou, Jianchao 5.0 CHN 2612 GM Zhigalko, Sergei 5.0 BLR 2587 ½-½
4 GM Bacrot, Etienne 4.5 FRA 2722 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 5.0 RUS 2664 1-0
5 GM Khairullin, Ildar 4.5 RUS 2574 GM Sargissian, Gabriel 4.5 ARM 2677 ½-½
6 GM Zhou, Weiqi 4.5 CHN 2542 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 4.5 RUS 2636 1-0
7 IM Kosintseva, Tatiana w 4.5 RUS 2497 GM Riazantsev, Alexander 4.5 RUS 2634 ½-½
8 GM Potkin, Vladimir 4.5 RUS 2613 GM Ehlvest, Jaan 4.5 USA 2595 1-0
9 GM Amonatov, Farrukh 4.0 TJK 2647 GM Dyachkov, Sergej 4.0 RUS 2553 ½-½
10 GM Smirin, Ilia 4.0 ISR 2647 GM Zhigalko, Andrey 4.0 BLR 2572 ½-½
11 GM Safarli, Eltaj j 4.0 AZE 2564 GM Bareev, Evgeny 4.0 RUS 2645 ½-½
12 GM Minasian, Artashes 4.0 ARM 2557 GM Aleksandrov, Aleksej 4.0 BLR 2636 0-1
13 GM Grigoriants, Sergey 4.0 RUS 2565 GM Kazhgaleyev, Murtas 4.0 KAZ 2630 ½-½
14 GM Nepomniachtchi, Ian 4.0 RUS 2628 IM Yudin, Sergei 4.0 RUS 2562 0-1
15 GM Ajrapetjan, Yuriy 4.0 UKR 2490 GM So, Wesley j 4.0 PHI 2627 ½-½
16 GM Filippov, Anton 4.0 UZB 2556 GM Landa, Konstantin 4.0 RUS 2626 ½-½
17 GM Dreev, Alexey 3.5 RUS 2688 GM Romanov, Evgeny 3.5 RUS 2576 1-0
18 GM Smirnov, Pavel 3.5 RUS 2579 GM Vitiugov, Nikita 3.5 RUS 2687 0-1
19 GM Sjugirov, Sanan j 3.5 RUS 2562 GM Grachev, Boris 3.5 RUS 2655 ½-½
20 GM Mamedov, Rauf 3.5 AZE 2638 IM Ponkratov, Pavel 3.5 RUS 2557 ½-½
21 GM Andriasian, Zaven 3.5 ARM 2564 GM Li, Chao b 3.5 CHN 2628 1-0
22 GM Kotsur, Pavel 3.5 KAZ 2563 GM Petrosian, Tigran L. 3.5 ARM 2623 1-0
23 GM Huzman, Alexander 3.5 ISR 2602 IM Robson, Ray j 3.5 USA 2455 1-0
24 GM Milov, Vadim 3.0 SUI 2669 GM Wen, Yang 3.5 CHN 2504 0-1

Aeroflot Open: Round 7 Ranking for section A1

Rank Name Flags Score Fed. M/F Rating TPR W-We Col.Bal. Rat-HiLo 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 GM Kurnosov, Igor 5.5 RUS M 2602 2862 +2.29 1 2645.2 1 1 1 ½ ½ 1 ½
2 GM Zhou, Jianchao 5.0 CHN M 2612 2785 +1.65 -1 2641.6 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½
3 GM Pashikian, Arman 5.0 ARM M 2621 2745 +1.18 -1 2579.4 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½
4 GM Predojevic, Borki 5.0 BIH M 2650 2723 +0.67 -1 2563.4 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1
5 GM Zhigalko, Sergei 5.0 BLR M 2587 2806 +2.08 1 2672.6 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1
6 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 5.0 UKR M 2676 2765 +0.83 1 2602.6 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½
7 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 5.0 RUS M 2664 2767 +0.96 1 2595.2 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1
8 GM Khairullin, Ildar 4.5 RUS M 2574 2718 +1.41 -1 2632.2 0 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1
9 GM Zhou, Weiqi 4.5 CHN M 2542 2730 +1.84 -1 2628.8 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1
10 IM Kosintseva, Tatiana w 4.5 RUS F 2497 2720 +2.15 -1 2616.6 ½ ½ 0 1 1 ½ 1
11 GM Bacrot, Etienne 4.5 FRA M 2722 2702 -0.16 -1 2598.8 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½
12 GM Potkin, Vladimir 4.5 RUS M 2613 2734 +1.18 1 2640.8 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½
13 GM Sargissian, Gabriel 4.5 ARM M 2677 2710 +0.33 1 2600.6 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½
14 GM Ehlvest, Jaan 4.5 USA M 2595 2686 +0.91 1 2590.6 1 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ 1
15 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 4.5 RUS M 2636 2696 +0.59 1 2576.0 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½
16 GM Riazantsev, Alexander 4.5 RUS M 2634 2665 +0.31 1 2562.4 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1

Aeroflot Open Chess Tournament:section A1 round 7

Here are the results from the top boards from round 7 of the Aeroflot Open section A1:

Pairings round 7 (Monday, 23 February 2009)

Table White Flags Score Fed. Rating Black Flags Score Fed. Rating Result
1 GM Kurnosov, Igor 5.0 RUS 2602 GM Zhou, Jianchao 4.5 CHN 2612 ½-½
2 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 4.5 UKR 2676 GM Pashikian, Arman 4.5 ARM 2621 ½-½
3 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 4.0 RUS 2636 GM Bacrot, Etienne 4.0 FRA 2722 ½-½
4 GM Sargissian, Gabriel 4.0 ARM 2677 GM Potkin, Vladimir 4.0 RUS 2613 ½-½
5 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 4.0 RUS 2664 GM Grigoriants, Sergey 4.0 RUS 2565 1-0
6 GM Zhigalko, Andrey 4.0 BLR 2572 GM Predojevic, Borki 4.0 BIH 2650 0-1
7 GM Vitiugov, Nikita 3.5 RUS 2687 GM Zhigalko, Sergei 4.0 BLR 2587 0-1
8 GM Minasian, Artashes 3.5 ARM 2557 GM Amonatov, Farrukh 3.5 TJK 2647 ½-½
9 GM Dyachkov, Sergej 3.5 RUS 2553 GM Smirin, Ilia 3.5 ISR 2647 ½-½
10 GM Aleksandrov, Aleksej 3.5 BLR 2636 GM Safarli, Eltaj j 3.5 AZE 2564 ½-½
11 GM Riazantsev, Alexander 3.5 RUS 2634 GM Kotsur, Pavel 3.5 KAZ 2563 1-0
12 GM Kazhgaleyev, Murtas 3.5 KAZ 2630 GM Filippov, Anton 3.5 UZB 2556 ½-½
13 GM Landa, Konstantin 3.5 RUS 2626 GM Ajrapetjan, Yuriy 3.5 UKR 2490 ½-½
14 GM Petrosian, Tigran L. 3.5 ARM 2623 GM Zhou, Weiqi 3.5 CHN 2542 0-1
15 GM Wen, Yang 3.5 CHN 2504 GM Ehlvest, Jaan 3.5 USA 2595 0-1
16 GM Romanov, Evgeny 3.5 RUS 2576 IM Kosintseva, Tatiana w 3.5 RUS 2497 0-1
17 IM Robson, Ray j 3.5 USA 2455 GM Khairullin, Ildar 3.5 RUS 2574 0-1

Analysis of Kamsky-Toplov game 6

Kamsky,G (2725) - Topalov,V (2796) [B12]
World Chess Challenge Sofia BUL (6), 24.02.2009
[Zappa Mexico II ]

B12: Caro-Kann: Advance Variation 1.e4 c6 The Caro-Kann defense,one of black's most solid responses to 1.e4.The opening is named after the English player Horatio Caro and the Austrian Marcus Kann who analyzed the opening in 1886. 2.d4 The main continuation, influencing the center and opening up lines in his formation for piece development 2...d5 Topalov creates tension in the center and threatens to win a pawn by playing 3...dxe4. 3.e5 This move allows us to define the variation being played, it is the "advance" variation. Kamsky closes the center,which makes it difficult for Topalov to develop his kingside minor pieces. 3...Bf5 The most often played move in this position. Topalov begins to develop his minor pieces. He intends to play ...e6 which will mean the bishop will be outside of his pawn chain and vunerable to attack. 4.Nf3 The most popular response to black's last move, beginning to develop his minor pieces. 4...e6 5.Be2 Kamsky simply develops another minor piece. 5...c5 Topalov moves the pawn a second time in the opening,which breaks an opening principle. However this idea is a key source of counterplay for Black in the Caro-Kann. [Analysis:Another main idea in this position is to play 5...Nd7 ] 6.Be3 The most-often played move in this position, threatening to win a pawn via 7.dxc5. 6...cxd4 Topalov reduces some of the central tension. [Analysis:Two moves are more popular in this position for black:(a) 6...Qb6 ; and (b) 6...Nd7 ] 7.Nxd4 Regaining his pawn and attacking Topalov's bishop. 7...Ne7 Developing another minor piece,which allows him to recapture on f5 with the knight if Kamsky were to play Nxf5. [Analysis:Rarely played in this position is: 7...Bg6 ] 8.Nd2 Kamsky decides to play a rarely-played continuation, testing Topalov's understanding of the Caro-Kann. According to my database this move was first played in 1996 in the game Pfreundtnet and Kersting.Kamsky intends to move this knight to f3 to create a double-attack against Topalov's light-squared bishop. 8...Nbc6 The main continuation, threatening to simply the position by playing 9....Nxd4. [Analysis:According to my database the move 8...Bg6 has also been tried by black in this position.] 9.N2f3 The only move White has played in this position according to my database and the chessbase online database.He develops another piece,which supports his other knight on d4. 9...Bg4 The most popular continuation, Topalov prevents Kamsky from removing his bishop from the game by 10.Nxf5. [9...a6 10.0-0 Bg4 11.c3 Qd7 12.Rc1 Rd8 13.h3 Bh5 14.a3 Na5 15.Nd2 Bxe2 16.Qxe2 Rc8 17.b3 Nac6 18.N2f3 Ng6 19.Nxc6 Rxc6 20.b4 Be7 21.c4 Rxc4 22.Rxc4 dxc4 23.Qxc4 0-0 24.Rc1 Svidler,P (2738)-Kamsky,G (2723)/Sochi 2008/CBM 126/1/2-1/2 (35)] 10.0-0 [Analysis:According to the chessbase online database the move 10.c3 hasalso been tried in this position:in the game Baer-Benassi, 2001] 10...Bxf3 This is the most often played move in this position for Black. Topalov decides to force kamsky to recapture on f3,by doing so he reduces the amount of material Kamsky can use to atttack. 11.Nxf3 The only move White has played in this position in my database and the chessbase online database.Apparently Kamsky did not feel up to trying 11.gxf3 which he could have used if Topalov had castled on the kingside.The fact that Topalov has yet to commit his king to either s idea of the board dissuaded Kamsky from trying 11.gxf3. 11...g6N Topalov decides to bring his king's bishop into play using a fianchetto. This idea has never been played before in any game in my database or the chessbase online database. [Analysis:Other moves tried here include: 11...Nf5, and 11...Ng6. (a)The move 11...Nf5 was played in the following game: 11...Nf5 12.Bf4 (12.Qd2 Be7 13.Rfd1 0-0 14.c3 Rc8 15.Bd3 Nxe3 16.Qxe3 Qb6 17.Qxb6 axb6 18.c4 dxc4 19.Bxc4 Rfd8 20.Rac1 Bc5 21.Bb5 Nb4 22.a3 Nd5 23.g3 Be7 24.Kg2 Rc5 25.Be2 Rdc8 26.Rxc5 Rxc5 Pfreundtner,B-Kersting,M (2280)/Germany 1996/EXT 1998/1/2-1/2 (42)) (b)The move 12...Be7 was tried in this game: 12...Be7 13.Bd3 Nh4 14.Nxh4 Bxh4 15.Qg4 g6 16.Rad1 h5 17.Qf3 g5 18.Bc1 g4 19.Qf4 Qc7 20.Rfe1 Rg8 21.Qh6 0-0-0 22.g3 Nxe5 23.Rxe5 Qxe5 24.gxh4 g3 25.hxg3 Rxg3+ 26.fxg3 Granda Zuniga,J (2628)-Gonzalez Vidal,Y (2473)/Havana 2003/CBM 096/1-0 (40); (c)The idea of 11...Ng6 has also been tried, as in this game: 11...Ng6 12.c4 dxc4 13.Bxc4 Qxd1 14.Rfxd1 a6 15.Bd3 0-0-0 16.Bxg6 Rxd1+ 17.Rxd1 fxg6 18.Ng5 Nxe5 19.Nxe6 Nc6 20.g4 Be7 21.g5 Nd8 22.Rc1+ Kd7 23.Nxd8 Rxd8 24.Rc4 Rc8 25.Rh4 h5 26.Rd4+ Zhigalko,S (2583)-Braun,A (2533)/Gaziantep 2008/CBM 125 Extra/1/2-1/2; Analysis:(d)The program Zappa II Mexico suggested playing 11...Qc7 with a possible continuation being: 12.c3 Ng6 13.Bd4 Be7 14.Rc1 Rc8 15.Qd2 Ngxe5 16.Nxe5 Nxe5 17.Bb5+ Kf8=] 12.c4!? Intending 13.cxd5. 12...Bg7 Creating a double-attack against Kamsky's e-pawn which is only protected by his knight. 13.cxd5 Now Topalov must decide how to recapture on d5. [Analysis Zappa II Mexico::Less effective is 13.Qb3 ie: 13.Qb3 Nxe5 14.Nxe5 Bxe5 15.f4 Bf6 16.Rfd1 Qa5 17.Bf3 (17.Qxb7 0-0 18.Qb5 Qxb5 19.cxb5 Nf5 20.Bf2 Bxb2 21.Rab1 Bc3 and White would lack sufficient compensation for the pawn.) ] 13...Nxd5 Attacking Kamsky's White-squared bishop. [Analysis Zappa II Mexico: If Kamsky would have recaptured with his queen play might have continued: 13...Qxd5 14.Qa4 Qa5 15.Qxa5 Nxa5 16.Rac1 Nac6 17.Rfd1 Rc8 18.Kh1 Nd5 +=] 14.Bc5!? Kamsky traps Topalov's king in the center,leaving his e-pawn enprise. 14...Bf8 Now Topalov threatens to win material: by playing 15...Bf8xc5. [Analysis:The e-pawn cannot be taken:(a) 14...Nxe5?? 15.Nxe5 Qa5 (15...Bxe5?? 16.Bb5+ Qd7 the only move which forces Topalov to lose his queen.) ; (b)Also worse is 14...Bxe5 15.Nxe5 Nxe5 16.Bb5+ Nc6 17.Qa4 Qd7 18.Rac1 f6 +=] 15.Qc1 Topalov has an active position [Analysis:the program Zappa II Mexico gave a better evaluation to the move 15.Bxf8 with a possible continuation being: 15.Bxf8 Kxf8 16.Bb5 (16.Bc4 Kg7 17.Rc1 Qb6 18.Qe2 Rhd8 19.Rfd1 Rac8 +=) 16...Kg7 17.Bxc6 bxc6 18.Qc2 Rb8 19.Rfd1 Qa5 20.a3 Rhc8 +=] 15...Rc8 Placing his rook on the same file as Kamskys' queen. [Analysis:Zappa II Mexico: 15...Bxc5 16.Qxc5 Rc8 17.Rfd1 Qb6 18.Qa3 Nce7 19.Qa4+ Kf8 =] 16.Bxf8 Simplying the position now Topalov has to decide how to recapture his piece. [Analysis:Zappa II:Mexico: 16.Rd1 Nb8 17.Bb5+ (17.b4 Nd7=) 17...Nd7 18.b4 a6 19.Bxd7+ Qxd7 20.Qa3 Bxc5 21.bxc5 Qe7 22.Rac1 0-0 =] 16...Nd4!?= Topalov threatens to win material: Nd4xe2 [Analysis:Zappa II Mexico:(a)Less advisable is 16...Rxf8 17.Bc4 Na5 18.Bb5+ Nc6 19.Nd4 Qb6 20.Rd1 Ke7 21.Qg5+ f6 22.exf6+ Rxf6 23.Bxc6 bxc6 +/-; (b)Worse is: 16...Kxf8 17.Qh6+ Kg8 18.Bc4 Nb6 19.Bb3 Qf8 20.Qe3 Kg7 21.Rfd1 Qe7 22.Nd4 Nxd4 23.Rxd4 Rhd8 24.Rad1 Rxd4 25.Qxd4 Qc5 +=] 17.Qd1 Attacking Topalov's knight,winning a tempo unless Topalov plays 17...Nxe2. 17...Nxe2+ 18.Qxe2 Kxf8 Topalov loses the right to castle [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II:Weaker is 18...Rxf8 19.Rac1+/- Rc6 20.Rxc6 bxc6 21.Qc4 Ne7 22.Rc1 Qb8 23.b3 Qb5+/-] 19.Rac1 Kamsky decides to fight for control of the open c-file even though this would allow Topalov to exchange rooks on c1. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 19.Rfd1 Kg7 20.Nd4 a6 21.Rd2 Rc7 22.Rad1 Qg5 23.g3 Rhc8 24.Qe4 Rc4 25.Kg2 Qd8 =] 19...Kg7 Allowing him to bring the rook on h8 into play. 20.h4 By playing 20.h4 Kamsky prevents Topalov from playing ...h6, followed by ....g5. [Analysis:Zappa II Mexico: 20.Rxc8 Qxc8 21.Nd4 Qc5 22.Rd1 Rc8 23.a3 Qc4 24.Qxc4 Rxc4 25.h3 Rc5 =] 20...Qb6 Forcing Kamsky to defend his b-pawn with his queen. 21.g3 Kamsky consolidates the f4-square. [Analysis:Zappa II Mexico: 21.Rfd1 Rhd8 22.Rxc8 Rxc8 23.Kh2 Qc6 24.Nd4 Nf4 25.Nxc6 Nxe2 26.Nxa7 Rc2 27.Nb5 Rxb2 28.a4 Nf4 =] 21...h6 Topalov prevents the intrusion of Kamsky's knight on g5. [Analysis:(a) 21...Rc5 22.Rxc5 Qxc5 23.Rd1 Rc8 24.Nd4 a6 25.h5 Qc4 26.Qxc4 Rxc4 27.hxg6 hxg6 =/+; (b) 21...Rc7 22.Rxc7 Qxc7 23.Nd4 Rc8 24.a3 Qb6 25.Rd1 Rd8 26.Nf3 Ne7 27.Rxd8 Qxd8 =] 22.a3 Controlling the b4-square. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 22.Rfd1 Rhd8 23.a3 Ne7 24.Rxc8 Rxc8 25.Kg2 Nd5 26.Nd4 Rd8 =] 22...Rc5 By playing this move Topalov can now double his rooks on the c-file if allowed to do so by Kamsky. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 22...Rhd8 23.Rfd1 Ne7 24.Rxc8 Rxc8 25.Kg2 Nd5 26.Nd4 Rd8 27.Nf3 Rc8 =] 23.Rc2 Kamsky intends to also double his rooks on the c-file if allowed to do so. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 23.Rxc5 Qxc5 24.Rd1 Rd8 25.Kh2 Qc6 26.Qe4 Rc8 27.Nd4 Qb6 28.Qe2 Rd8 =] 23...Rhc8 [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 23...Rxc2 24.Qxc2 Ne7 25.Rd1 Rd8 26.Rxd8 Qxd8 27.Qc3 Qd5 28.Nd4 a6 29.Kh2 Nf5 30.Nxf5+ gxf5 =] 24.Rfc1 a5 Preventing Kamsky from playing 25.b4. Topalov did not want to play 24....Rxc2 because after 25.Rxc2 Rxc2 26.Qxc2 Kamsky would gain control of the open c-file. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 24...Rxc2 25.Rxc2 Rxc2 26.Qxc2 Ne7 27.Kg2 Nc6 28.b4 a5 29.bxa5 Qxa5 30.Qb3 b6 =] 25.Qd2 Attacking Topalov's a-pawn which ties down one of Topalov's pieces to protect this pawn. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 25.Qe4 Rxc2 26.Rxc2 Rxc2 27.Qxc2 Ne7 28.Qc3 a4 29.Nd2 Qd8 30.Nc4 Qd1+ 31.Kg2 Qd5+ 32.Kh2 Qc5 =] 25...Rxc2 Topalov decides to break the symmetry.Often this can allow the player who captures last in an exchange to gain an advantage. 26.Rxc2 Rc5 Overprotecting his a-pawn. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: (a) 26...Rc6 27.Qe2 Rxc2 28.Qxc2 Ne7 29.Kg2 Nc6 30.b3 Nd4 31.Nxd4 Qxd4 32.Qe2 Qc5 =; (b) 26...Rxc2 27.Qxc2 Ne7 28.b3 Nf5 29.Kg2 Nd4 30.Nxd4 Qxd4 31.Qe2 Qc5 =] 27.Qc1 Creating the threat of 28.Rxc5 winning a piece. 27...Rxc2 28.Qxc2 Ne7 Intending ...Nc6. Zappa Mexico II evaluates this position as equal. 29.Qc3 Attacking Topalov's a-pawn forcing Topalov to tie down his queen to defend this pawn. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 29.b3 Nf5 30.Kg2 Nd4 31.Nxd4 Qxd4 32.Qe2 b6 33.Qe3 Qxe3 34.fxe3 Kf8 35.Kf3 Ke7 36.b4 axb4 37.axb4 b5 =] 29...Nc6 Overprotecting his a-pawn,which frees up Topalov's queen to do other things. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 29...a4 30.Nd2 Qd8 31.Nc4 Qd1+ 32.Kg2 Qd5+ 33.Kh2 Nc6 34.Nd6 Nxe5 35.Nxb7 Kg8 36.Nc5 h5 37.Qb4 Ng4+ 38.Kg1 Qd1+ 39.Kg2 Qc2 =] 30.b3 Preventing Topalov from playing ...a4. 30...Qd8 By playing this move Topalov seems to indicate he is going to play ...g5 in the immediate future as this queen move supports the advance of his g-pawn. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 30...Qb5 31.Qe3 Qd5 32.Kh2 Ne7 33.Nd4 Nf5 34.Nxf5+ gxf5 35.Kg1 Kg6 =] 31.a4 Kamsky spends a move to prevent Topalov from playing ....b5. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 31.Qe3 Qd5 32.Kh2 Ne7 33.Nd4 h5 34.a4 Nf5 35.Nxf5+ exf5 36.Kg1 Kf8 =] 31...Qd1+=/+ Attacking Kamsky's b-pawn and knight forcing Kamsky to keep his queen protecting both. [Zappa Mexico II: 31...Qd1+ 32.Kg2 Qd5 33.Kh2 Qe4 34.Qe3 Qxe3 35.fxe3 f6 36.Nd4 Nxd4 37.exd4 f5-/+] 32.Kg2 Kamsky spends a tempo to overprotect his knight,which frees his queen to defend h is b-pawn. 32...Qe2 [Analysis:Zappa Mexico I: 32...Qd5 33.Kf1 Nb4 34.Nd4 Qh1+ 35.Ke2 Nd5 36.Qd3 Qc1 37.Qd2 Qa1 38.Nf3 b6 =/+] 33.Qe3 Kamsky offers Topalov the exchange of queens. 33...Qd1 Topalov declines the offer at the cost of a tempo. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 33...Qxe3 34.fxe3 f6 35.g4 (35.exf6+ Kxf6 36.Kf2 Ne5 37.e4 Nd7 38.Nd2 Nc5 39.Ke3 e5 =) ] 34.Nd2= Kamsky decides to overprotect his b-pawn. The program Zappa Mexico II evaluates this position as being slightly favorable to Topalov: = (-0.14). [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 34.Nd2 Nb4 35.Nc4 Nc2 36.Qf4 Qd5+ 37.f3 Qd3 38.Kf2 Nd4 = (38...Qxb3 39.Nd6 Qb6+ 40.Kg2 Ne3+ 41.Kh3 Nf5 42.g4 Nxd6 43.exd6 Qf2 =) ] 34...Nb4 Topalov plays this move so that if Kamsky plays 35.Nc4 (threatening 36.Nxa5), Topalov can prevent the loss of a pawn by winning a tempo against Kamsky's queen (by playing 35...Nc2). 35.Nc4 Kamsky threatens to win material: Nc4xa5 35...Nc2 Topalov threatens to win Kamsky's queen so Topalov threatens to win a tempo. 36.Qd2 Kamsky threatens to win Topalov's queen via 37.Qxd2, therefore if Topalov wants to avoid the exchange of queens he must try to avoid the loss of a tempo if at all possible. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 36.Qf4 Qd5+ 37.Kf1 Nd4 (threatening ...Qh1 checkmate) 38.f3 Kg8 39.Kf2 Qc5 40.Kf1 Qd5 =] 36...Qb1 Topalov avoids the loss of a tempo and threatens to win one by attacking Kamsky's unprotected b-pawn. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 36...Qxd2 37.Nxd2 Nd4 38.f4 g5 39.hxg5 hxg5 40.Kf2 (40.fxg5 Kg6 41.Kf2 Kxg5 =) 40...g4 41.Ke3 Nf5+ 42.Kd3 Nxg3 43.Nc4 b6 44.Nxb6 Nf5 =] 37.Qf4 Kamsky offers to exchange his b-pawn for Topalov's a-pawn. [Analysis:(a) 37.Nxa5?? taking the pawn is naive 37...Ne1+ -+ 38.Qxe1 (38.Kh3 Qf5+ 39.Kh2 (the only move) 39...Nf3+ 40.Kg2 (40.Kh1 Qh3# checkmate) 40...Nxd2 -+) 38...Qxe1-+; (b)Another alternative was 37.Qxa5 : 37...Ne1+ 38.Kh2 (38.Kf1 Nd3+ 39.Kg2 Qxb3=) 38...Nf3+ 39.Kg2 Qxb3 40.Nd6 b6 41.Qa8 Nxe5 42.Ne8+ Kh8 (42...Kh7 43.Nf6+ Kg7 44.Ne8+ Kh8 45.Nf6+ Kg7 =) 43.Nf6+ Kg7 =(the only move)] 37...Ne1+ Winning a tempo. [Worse is 37...Qxb3 38.Nd6 Qd5+ 39.f3 Ne1+ 40.Kf1 Nxf3 41.Qxf7+ Kh8 42.Qf6+ Kh7 (42...Kg8?? 43.Qxg6+ Kh8 44.Nf7#) 43.Nf7+/- (threatening 44.Qh8 checkmate) 43...Kg8 44.Nxh6+ Kh7 the only move 45.Nf7 Kg8 46.Qxg6+ Kf8 47.Nd8 Qxd8 48.Qh6+ Ke7 49.Qf6+ Ke8 50.Qxf3 +/-] 38.Kh2 The lost tempo. [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 38.Kh3 Nd3 39.Qf6+ Kg8 40.Nd6 Qh1+ 41.Kg4 Qd1+ 42.Kh3 Qh1+ with a draw by repetition of position.] 38...Qxb3 Topalov decides to exchange pawns. 39.Qf6+ [Analysis:(a) 39.Nxa5?? the pawn must be left alone, otherwise White will be punished 39...Qd5 40.Qf6+ Kg8 41.Qd8+ Qxd8-+; (b) 39.Kh3 Qd3 40.Qf6+ Kg8 41.Nd6 Qf1+ 42.Kg4 Qe2+ 43.Kh3 Qf1+ =] 39...Kg8 [Analysis:(a)Worse are:(a) 39...Kf8 40.Nd6 Nf3+ 41.Kg2 Nxe5 (the only way to prevent checkmate) 42.Qxe5 Ke7 43.Qc5 Qxa4 +-; (b) 39...Kh7?? 40.Qxf7+ Kh8 41.Qf8+ Kh7 42.Qe7+ Kg8 43.Qxe6+ Kh8 44.Qc8+ Kg7 45.Qd7+ Kg8 46.Qe6+ Kh8 47.Qf6+ Kh7 48.Ne3 +-] 40.Qd8+ [Analysis:Topalov's a-pawn is poisoned: 40.Nxa5?? a poisoned pawn 40... 40...Qd5 41.Qd8+ Qxd8-+ 42.Nc4 Nf3+ 43.Kg2 Nxh4+ 44.gxh4 Qd5+ -+] 40...Kh7 41.Qf6 Threatening to play: 42.Qxf7 41...Kg8 [Analysis:Zappa Mexico II: 41...Qxc4 42.Qxf7+ Kh8 43.Qf8+ with a draw] 42.Qd8+ [Analysis:Once again Topalov's a-pawn is poisoned as shown by this variation: 42.Nxa5 Qd5 (threatening Qg2 checkmate) which forces 43.Qd8+ ((b) 43.Kh3 h5 (threatening ....Qg2 checkmate which forces): 44.Qd8+ Qxd8 45.Nxb7 Qd5 46.f3 Qxf3 47.Kh2 Qg2#) 43...Qxd8 44.Nc4 (44.Kg1 Qd5 45.Kf1 Nd3 -+) 44...Qd1 45.Ne3 Qf3 46.Kg1 Nd3 47.Nd1 Qxd1+ 48.Kg2 Qd2 49.h5 Qxf2+ 50.Kh3 Qf1+ 51.Kh2 Ne1 52.hxg6 Qg2#] 42...Kh7 Twofold repetition 43.Qf6 Kg8 The two players agreed to a draw before the position was repeated three times which would have been a formal draw. 1/2-1/2

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Game 6 of the World Chess Challenge drawn

GM's Topalov and Kamsky drew game six of the World Chess Challenge today. With Topalov playing black, he decided to play the solid Caro-Kann defense when Kamsky opened the game with 1.e4 Kamsky chose to play the advance variation. I will upload analysis of this game to my blog.

Topalov wins game 5

GM Veselin Topalov won the fifth game of the World Chess Challenge match with GM Gata Kamsky on Monday. Kamsky played the French Defense for the first time in his career and ended up with two isolated pawns in the endgame (one of them a passed pawn). However, it was two errors by Kamsky (on moves 32 and 35 which sealed his fate in the game). You can play through the moves of this game below, with analysis by Deep Rybka 3 and myself.

Sunday, February 22, 2009

Aeroflot Open Chess Tournament:section A1 round 6

Aeroflot Open Chess Tournament:section A1 round 6 standings
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Here are the standings after 6 rounds in the top A1 section:

Rank Name Flags Score Fed. M/F Rating TPR W-We 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 GM Kurnosov, Igor 5.0 RUS M 2602 2908 +2.28 1 1 1 ½ ½ 1
2 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 4.5 UKR M 2676 2797 +0.91 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½
3 GM Pashikian, Arman 4.5 ARM M 2621 2765 +1.10 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1
4 GM Zhou, Jianchao 4.5 CHN M 2612 2824 +1.66 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1
5 GM Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 4.0 AZE M 2724 2735 +0.07 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 0
6 GM Bacrot, Etienne 4.0 FRA M 2722 2719 -0.04 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½
7 GM Sargissian, Gabriel 4.0 ARM M 2677 2732 +0.42 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½
8 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 4.0 RUS M 2664 2742 +0.60 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½
9 GM Predojevic, Borki 4.0 BIH M 2650 2688 +0.28 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1
10 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 4.0 RUS M 2636 2698 +0.47 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1
11 GM Potkin, Vladimir 4.0 RUS M 2613 2749 +1.09 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1
12 GM Zhigalko, Sergei 4.0 BLR M 2587 2766 +1.44 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½
13 GM Zhigalko, Andrey 4.0 BLR M 2572 2787 +1.73 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½
14 GM Grigoriants, Sergey 4.0 RUS M 2565 2765 +1.63 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1

Aeroflot Open Chess Tournament:section A1 round 6 results

Aeroflot Open:round 6 standings :section A1
Here are the results from the top boards from round 6 at the Aeroflot Open chess Tournament.

Pairings round 6 (Sunday, 22 February 2009)

Table White Flags Score Fed. Rating Black Flags Score Fed. Rating Result
1 GM Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 4.0 AZE 2724 GM Kurnosov, Igor 4.0 RUS 2602 0-1
2 GM Sargissian, Gabriel 3.5 ARM 2677 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 4.0 UKR 2676 ½-½
3 GM Bacrot, Etienne 3.5 FRA 2722 GM Zhigalko, Andrey 3.5 BLR 2572 ½-½
4 GM Zhigalko, Sergei 3.5 BLR 2587 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 3.5 RUS 2664 ½-½
5 GM Zhou, Jianchao 3.5 CHN 2612 GM Kazhgaleyev, Murtas 3.5 KAZ 2630 1-0
6 GM Safarli, Eltaj j 3.5 AZE 2564 GM Pashikian, Arman 3.5 ARM 2621 0-1
7 GM Ehlvest, Jaan 3.0 USA 2595 GM Vitiugov, Nikita 3.0 RUS 2687 ½-½
8 GM Potkin, Vladimir 3.0 RUS 2613 GM Grachev, Boris 3.0 RUS 2655 1-0
9 GM Predojevic, Borki 3.0 BIH 2650 GM Smirnov, Pavel 3.0 RUS 2579 1-0
10 GM Amonatov, Farrukh 3.0 TJK 2647 GM Romanov, Evgeny 3.0 RUS 2576 ½-½
11 GM Grigoriants, Sergey 3.0 RUS 2565 GM Bareev, Evgeny 3.0 RUS 2645 1-0
12 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 3.0 RUS 2636 IM Ponkratov, Pavel 3.0 RUS 2557 1-0
13 GM Filippov, Anton 3.0 UZB 2556 GM Riazantsev, Alexander 3.0 RUS 2634 ½-½
14 IM Kosintseva, Tatiana w 3.0 RUS 2497 GM Landa, Konstantin 3.0 RUS 2626 ½-½

Major Controvery at the Aeroflot Open

A major controversy has arisen at the Aeroflot Open Chess Tournament. As reported at the chessbase.com website and other chess websites before myself, the top-seeded player in the top A1 section, GM Shakhriyar Mamedyarov has decided to withdraw from the tournament, His withdrawl is due to the fact that he lost his sixth round game to Igor Kurnosov in 21 moves. Mamedyarov claims he used the program Rybka to analyze his loss after the game and Mamedyarov claims "He discovered a close correlation between the moves of the computer and those of his opponent." Furthermore Kurnosov, who is rated over 100 points below Mamedyarov, apparently kept withdrawning from the board after each move. All of this led to the following formal protest that was filed by the Azerbaijani GM: see http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=5232

The moves in the disputed game were as follows:
Mamedyarov,S (2724) - Kurnosov,I (2602) [D70]
Aeroflot Open Moscow RUS (6), 22.02.2009
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.f3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nb6 6.Nc3 Bg7 7.Be3 0-0 8.Qd2 Nc6 9.0-0-0 f5 10.h4 fxe4 11.h5 gxh5 12.d5 Ne5 13.Bh6 Nec4 14.Qg5 Rf7 15.Bxc4 Nxc4 16.Rd4N 16...Qd6 17.Bxg7 Rxg7 18.Qxh5 Qf4+ 19.Kb1 Bf5 20.fxe4 Bg4 21.Nge2 Qd2 0-1.
Is this the beginning of a new era in chess, one in which (especially in tournaments involving alot of money) players are going to have to be searched prior to the game, and watched by video cameras when they leave their board during the game? Stay tuned!

Linares 2009:Update round 4

The fourth round of the Linares chess tournament was played today in the Spanish city, with three of the four games having decisive results! Here are the results of the games:


Round 4 (February 22, 2009)

Aronian, Levon - Dominguez Perez, Leinier 1-0 92 D27 Queen's Gambit Accepted
Anand, Viswanathan - Wang Yue 1-0 33 D15 Slav Defence
Carlsen, Magnus - Ivanchuk, Vassily ½-½ 34 D81 Gruenfeld Botvinnik variation, Radjabov, Teimour - Grischuk, Alexander 0-1 41 E17 Queens Indian Defense.

Here are the standings after 4 rounds of play:please click on the crosstable to view it:

Linares 2009:round 3 update

After 3 rounds of play, two players, GM Levon Aronian and GM Alexander Grischuk, lead the 2009 edition of the Linares Chess Tournament being played in Spain.Both have scored one win and two draws so far. Here are the standings:

1. Aronian, Levon 2 g ARM 2750
2. Grischuk, Alexander 2 g RUS 2733
3. Dominguez Perez, Leinier 1,5 g CUB 2717
4. Carlsen, Magnus 1,5 g NOR 2776
5. Ivanchuk, Vassily 1,5 g UKR 2779
5. Anand, Viswanathan 1,5 g IND 2791
7. Radjabov, Teimour 1 g AZE 2761
8. Wang Yue 1 g CHN 2739


Results
-------

Round 1 (February 19, 2009)
Aronian, Levon - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 37 E06 Catalan
Dominguez Perez, Leinier - Grischuk, Alexander ½-½ 30 C19 French Winawer
Anand, Viswanathan - Radjabov, Teimour 1-0 61 B33 Sicilian Sveshnikov
Wang Yue - Ivanchuk, Vassily ½-½ 31 E11 Bogo Indian Defence

Round 2 (February 20, 2009)
Grischuk, Alexander - Wang Yue 1-0 57 D17 Slav Defence
Carlsen, Magnus - Dominguez Perez, Leinier ½-½ 18 A33 English Symmetrical
Anand, Viswanathan - Aronian, Levon 0-1 53 D47 Queens Gambit Meran
Radjabov, Teimour - Ivanchuk, Vassily ½-½ 42 E94 King's Indian Classical

Round 3 (February 21, 2009)
Aronian, Levon - Radjabov, Teimour ½-½ 42 E61 King's Indian Defence
Dominguez Perez, Leinier - Anand, Viswanathan ½-½ 42 B90 Sicilian Najdorf Variation
Ivanchuk, Vassily - Grischuk, Alexander ½-½ 65 E21 Nimzo Indian 4.Nf3
Wang Yue - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 57 D37 QGD 5.Bf4

Aeroflot Open:round 6 pairings:section A1

Here are the round 6-pairings for the top section (A1)to be played on Sunday.

Pairings round 6 (Sunday, 22 February 2009)

Table White Flags Score Fed. Rating Black Flags Score Fed. Rating Result
1 GM Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 4.0 AZE 2724 GM Kurnosov, Igor 4.0 RUS 2602
2 GM Sargissian, Gabriel 3.5 ARM 2677 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 4.0 UKR 2676
3 GM Bacrot, Etienne 3.5 FRA 2722 GM Zhigalko, Andrey 3.5 BLR 2572
4 GM Zhigalko, Sergei 3.5 BLR 2587 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 3.5 RUS 2664
5 GM Zhou, Jianchao 3.5 CHN 2612 GM Kazhgaleyev, Murtas 3.5 KAZ 2630
6 GM Safarli, Eltaj j 3.5 AZE 2564 GM Pashikian, Arman 3.5 ARM 2621
7 GM Ehlvest, Jaan 3.0 USA 2595 GM Vitiugov, Nikita 3.0 RUS 2687
8 GM Potkin, Vladimir 3.0 RUS 2613 GM Grachev, Boris 3.0 RUS 2655
9 GM Predojevic, Borki 3.0 BIH 2650 GM Smirnov, Pavel 3.0 RUS 2579
10 GM Amonatov, Farrukh 3.0 TJK 2647 GM Romanov, Evgeny 3.0 RUS 2576
11 GM Grigoriants, Sergey 3.0 RUS 2565 GM Bareev, Evgeny 3.0 RUS 2645
12 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 3.0 RUS 2636 IM Ponkratov, Pavel 3.0 RUS 2557
13 GM Filippov, Anton 3.0 UZB 2556 GM Riazantsev, Alexander 3.0 RUS 2634
14 IM Kosintseva, Tatiana w 3.0 RUS 2497 GM Landa, Konstantin 3.0 RUS 2626

Aeroflot Open:Round 5 standings:section A1

Here are the standings after 5 rounds of play in the top A1 section of the Aeroflot Open chess tournament:

Ranking after round 5 (Sunday, 22 February 2009)

Rank Name Flags Score Fed. M/F Rating TPR W-We 1 2 3 4 5
1 GM Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 4.0 AZE M 2724 2852 +0.74 ½ 1 1 ½ 1
2 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 4.0 UKR M 2676 2830 +0.91 1 ½ 1 ½ 1
3 GM Kurnosov, Igor 4.0 RUS M 2602 2857 +1.61 1 1 1 ½ ½
4 GM Bacrot, Etienne 3.5 FRA M 2722 2747 +0.16 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½
5 GM Sargissian, Gabriel 3.5 ARM M 2677 2742 +0.42 ½ ½ 1 1 ½
6 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 3.5 RUS M 2664 2772 +0.71 1 ½ 1 ½ ½
7 GM Kazhgaleyev, Murtas 3.5 KAZ M 2630 2738 +0.73 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½
8 GM Pashikian, Arman 3.5 ARM M 2621 2723 +0.68 ½ ½ ½ 1 1
9 GM Zhou, Jianchao 3.5 CHN M 2612 2780 +1.13 1 ½ ½ 1 ½
10 GM Zhigalko, Sergei 3.5 BLR M 2587 2785 +1.33 ½ ½ ½ 1 1
11 GM Zhigalko, Andrey 3.5 BLR M 2572 2799 +1.53 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1
12 GM Safarli, Eltaj j 3.5 AZE M 2564 2786 +1.51 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1
13 GM Vitiugov, Nikita 3.0 RUS M 2687 2672 -0.09 1 ½ ½ ½ ½
14 GM Grachev, Boris 3.0 RUS M 2655 2707 +0.37 ½ 1 1 ½ 0
15 GM Predojevic, Borki 3.0 BIH M 2650 2632 -0.12 0 ½ ½ 1 1
16 GM Amonatov, Farrukh 3.0 TJK M 2647 2642 -0.02 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½
17 GM Bareev, Evgeny 3.0 RUS M 2645 2648 +0.03 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½
18 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 3.0 RUS M 2636 2648 +0.08 1 ½ ½ ½ ½
19 GM Riazantsev, Alexander 3.0 RUS M 2634 2637 +0.02 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½
20 GM Landa, Konstantin 3.0 RUS M 2626 2672 +0.31 1 ½ ½ ½ ½
21 GM Potkin, Vladimir 3.0 RUS M 2613 2690 +0.53 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½
22 GM Ehlvest, Jaan 3.0 USA M 2595 2651 +0.40 1 ½ ½ 0 1
23 GM Smirnov, Pavel 3.0 RUS M 2579 2736 +1.08 1 1 0 ½ ½
24 GM Romanov, Evgeny 3.0 RUS M 2576 2733 +1.08 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½
25 GM Grigoriants, Sergey 3.0 RUS M 2565 2711 +1.02 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½
26 IM Ponkratov, Pavel 3.0 RUS M 2557 2703 +1.01 1 1 0 1 0
27 GM Filippov, Anton 3.0 UZB M 2556 2700 +1.01 0 ½ 1 1 ½
28 IM Kosintseva, Tatiana w 3.0 RUS F 2497 2697 +1.37 ½ ½ 0 1 1

Aeroflot Open:Round 5 results section A1:top boards

Here are the results from the top boards for Round 5 of the A1 section:

Table White Flags Score Fed. Rating Black Flags Score Fed. Rating Result
1 GM Kurnosov, Igor 3.5 RUS 2602 GM Bacrot, Etienne 3.0 FRA 2722 ½-½
2 GM Grachev, Boris 3.0 RUS 2655 GM Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 3.0 AZE 2724 0-1
3 GM Kazhgaleyev, Murtas 3.0 KAZ 2630 GM Sargissian, Gabriel 3.0 ARM 2677 ½-½
4 IM Ponkratov, Pavel 3.0 RUS 2557 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 3.0 UKR 2676 0-1
5 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 3.0 RUS 2664 GM Zhou, Jianchao 3.0 CHN 2612 ½-½
6 GM Pashikian, Arman 2.5 ARM 2621 GM Naiditsch, Arkadij 2.5 GER 2693 1-0
7 GM Vitiugov, Nikita 2.5 RUS 2687 GM Romanov, Evgeny 2.5 RUS 2576 ½-½
8 GM Landa, Konstantin 2.5 RUS 2626 GM Amonatov, Farrukh 2.5 TJK 2647 ½-½
9 GM Zhigalko, Sergei 2.5 BLR 2587 GM Smirin, Ilia 2.5 ISR 2647 1-0
10 GM Bareev, Evgeny 2.5 RUS 2645 GM Potkin, Vladimir 2.5 RUS 2613 ½-½
11 GM Zhigalko, Andrey 2.5 BLR 2572 GM Mamedov, Rauf 2.5 AZE 2638 1-0
12 GM Smirnov, Pavel 2.5 RUS 2579 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 2.5 RUS 2636 ½-½
13 GM Riazantsev, Alexander 2.5 RUS 2634 GM Grigoriants, Sergey 2.5 RUS 2565 ½-½
14 GM So, Wesley j 2.5 PHI 2627 GM Safarli, Eltaj j 2.5 AZE 2564 0-1

Aeroflot Open:Round 4 Standings:section A1

Here are the standings after 4 rounds of play in the top A1 section of the Aeroflot Open Chess Tournament:

Rank Name Flags Score Fed. M/F Rating TPR W-We 1 2 3 4
1 GM Kurnosov, Igor 3.5 RUS M 2602 2927 +1.45 1 1 1 ½
2 GM Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 3.0 AZE M 2724 2794 +0.34 ½ 1 1 ½
3 GM Bacrot, Etienne 3.0 FRA M 2722 2790 +0.32 ½ 1 ½ 1
4 GM Sargissian, Gabriel 3.0 ARM M 2677 2777 +0.49 ½ ½ 1 1
5 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 3.0 UKR M 2676 2791 +0.57 1 ½ 1 ½
6 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 3.0 RUS M 2664 2818 +0.78 1 ½ 1 ½
7 GM Grachev, Boris 3.0 RUS M 2655 2806 +0.77 ½ 1 1 ½
8 GM Kazhgaleyev, Murtas 3.0 KAZ M 2630 2761 +0.66 ½ 1 ½ 1
9 GM Zhou, Jianchao 3.0 CHN M 2612 2816 +1.06 1 ½ ½ 1
10 IM Ponkratov, Pavel 3.0 RUS M 2557 2813 +1.35 1 1 0 1
11 GM Naiditsch, Arkadij 2.5 GER M 2693 2716 +0.11 1 ½ ½ ½
12 GM Vitiugov, Nikita 2.5 RUS M 2687 2701 +0.06 1 ½ ½ ½
13 GM Amonatov, Farrukh 2.5 TJK M 2647 2651 +0.01 ½ ½ ½ 1
14 GM Smirin, Ilia 2.5 ISR M 2647 2661 +0.06 ½ ½ 1 ½
15 GM Bareev, Evgeny 2.5 RUS M 2645 2661 +0.07 ½ ½ ½ 1
16 GM Mamedov, Rauf 2.5 AZE M 2638 2659 +0.10 ½ ½ ½ 1
17 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 2.5 RUS M 2636 2670 +0.16 1 ½ ½ ½
18 GM Riazantsev, Alexander 2.5 RUS M 2634 2660 +0.12 ½ 1 ½ ½
19 GM So, Wesley j 2.5 PHI M 2627 2639 +0.03 1 0 1 ½
20 GM Landa, Konstantin 2.5 RUS M 2626 2684 +0.28 1 ½ ½ ½
21 GM Pashikian, Arman 2.5 ARM M 2621 2639 +0.08 ½ ½ ½ 1
22 GM Potkin, Vladimir 2.5 RUS M 2613 2707 +0.49 ½ 1 ½ ½
23 GM Zhigalko, Sergei 2.5 BLR M 2587 2729 +0.75 ½ ½ ½ 1
24 GM Smirnov, Pavel 2.5 RUS M 2579 2767 +1.00 1 1 0 ½
25 GM Romanov, Evgeny 2.5 RUS M 2576 2749 +0.93 ½ 1 ½ ½
26 GM Zhigalko, Andrey 2.5 BLR M 2572 2748 +0.94 ½ ½ 1 ½
27 GM Grigoriants, Sergey 2.5 RUS M 2565 2735 +0.92 ½ 1 ½ ½
28 GM Safarli, Eltaj j 2.5 AZE M 2564 2734 +0.92 ½ 1 ½ ½
29 GM Filippov, Anton 2.5 UZB M 2556 2722 +0.90 0 ½ 1 1

Aeroflot Open:Round 4 results section A1:top boards

Here are the results from round 4 for the top boards in the top section:A1:

Table White Flags Score Fed. Rating Black Flags Score Fed. Rating Result
1 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 2.5 UKR 2676 GM Kurnosov, Igor 3.0 RUS 2602 ½-½
2 GM Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2.5 AZE 2724 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2.5 RUS 2664 ½-½
3 GM Naiditsch, Arkadij 2.0 GER 2693 GM Grachev, Boris 2.5 RUS 2655 ½-½
4 GM Bacrot, Etienne 2.0 FRA 2722 GM Lysyj, Igor 2.0 RUS 2620 1-0
5 GM Potkin, Vladimir 2.0 RUS 2613 GM Vitiugov, Nikita 2.0 RUS 2687 ½-½
6 GM Sargissian, Gabriel 2.0 ARM 2677 GM Ehlvest, Jaan 2.0 USA 2595 1-0
7 GM Smirin, Ilia 2.0 ISR 2647 GM Smirnov, Pavel 2.0 RUS 2579 ½-½
8 GM Zhou, Jianchao 2.0 CHN 2612 GM Aleksandrov, Aleksej 2.0 BLR 2636 1-0
9 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 2.0 RUS 2636 GM Zhigalko, Andrey 2.0 BLR 2572 ½-½
10 GM Romanov, Evgeny 2.0 RUS 2576 GM Riazantsev, Alexander 2.0 RUS 2634 ½-½
11 GM Kazhgaleyev, Murtas 2.0 KAZ 2630 GM Dziuba, Marcin 2.0 POL 2556 1-0
12 GM Grigoriants, Sergey 2.0 RUS 2565 GM So, Wesley j 2.0 PHI 2627 ½-½
13 GM Safarli, Eltaj j 2.0 AZE 2564 GM Landa, Konstantin 2.0 RUS 2626 ½-½
14 IM Ponkratov, Pavel 2.0 RUS 2557 GM Petrosian, Tigran L. 2.0 ARM 2623 1-0
15 GM Amonatov, Farrukh 1.5 TJK 2647 GM Melkumyan, Hrant 2.0 ARM 2519 1-

Aeroflot Open:Round 3 results section A1:top boards

Pairings round 3 (Thursday, 19 February 2009)
Here are the round 3 results from the top boards for section A1:

Table White Flags Score Fed. Rating Black Flags Score Fed. Rating Result

1 GM Kurnosov, Igor 2.0 RUS 2602 IM Ponkratov, Pavel 2.0 RUS 2557 1-0
2 GM Smirnov, Pavel 2.0 RUS 2579 GM Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 1.5 AZE 2724 0-1
3 GM Potkin, Vladimir 1.5 RUS 2613 GM Bacrot, Etienne 1.5 FRA 2722 ½-½
4 GM Naiditsch, Arkadij 1.5 GER 2693 GM Lysyj, Igor 1.5 RUS 2620 ½-½
5 GM Vitiugov, Nikita 1.5 RUS 2687 GM Zhou, Jianchao 1.5 CHN 2612 ½-½
6 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 1.5 UKR 2676 GM Ghaem Maghami, Ehsan 1.5 IRI 2604 1-0
7 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 1.5 RUS 2664 GM Huzman, Alexander 1.5 ISR 2602 1-0
8 GM Grachev, Boris 1.5 RUS 2655 GM Vaganian, Rafael A 1.5 ARM 2596 1-0
9 GM Aleksandrov, Aleksej 1.5 BLR 2636 GM Grigoriants, Sergey 1.5 RUS 2565 ½-½
10 GM Romanov, Evgeny 1.5 RUS 2576 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 1.5 RUS 2636 ½-½
11 GM Riazantsev, Alexander 1.5 RUS 2634 GM Safarli, Eltaj j 1.5 AZE 2564 ½-½
12 GM Ehlvest, Jaan 1.5 USA 2595 GM Kazhgaleyev, Murtas 1.5 KAZ 2630 ½-½
13 GM Dziuba, Marcin 1.5 POL 2556 GM Landa, Konstantin 1.5 RUS 2626 ½-½

Saturday, February 21, 2009

Topalov-Kamsky Game 4:Kamsky ties the match!

Game four of the Topalov-Kamsky match has been played and Kamsky tied the match by winning the game. Kamsky began the game by playing the Ruy Lopez Opening, one which gives good play for both sides. What transpired next is a surprise to me:Topalov decided to play the Flohr-Zaitsev variation for Black (why not play the Berlin Defense again? Topalov apparently feared that Kamsky would be able to improve on his play from the game he lost as white). The Flohr-Zaitsev variation was made famous by former World Chess Champion Anatoly Karpov who used it against Kasparov in a number of their matches (Zaitsev was one of Karpov's trainers). Here is how the game transpired :

Kamsky,Gata (2796) - Topalov,Veselin (2725) [C92]
FIDE Candidates 2009 (4), 21.02.2009
[,Wayne,Deep Rybka 3]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Kamsky tries the Ruy Lopez again to try and draw equal in the match. 3...a6!? A surprise. Topalov had won with the Berlin Defense. Was he trying to spoil and waste all the work Kamsky and his seconds had done trying to crack the Berlin defense? 4.Ba4 Nf6 The main continuation, developing another minor piece, and attacking Kamsky's unprotected e-pawn. 5.0-0 The most popular continuation, Kamsky invites Topalov to play the Open Defense of the Ruy Lopez 5...Nxe4. 5...Be7 The main continuation, simply developing another minor piece, and preparing to castle on the kingside. 6.Re1 Spending a tempo to prevent the loss of his e-pawn. 6...b5 Driving back Kamsky's bishop once again, preventing Kamsky from playing the deferred exchange variation (7.Bxc6). 7.Bb3 The only square the bishop can move to. Now however,the bishop hits the weak f7-point in Topalov's position. 7...d6 This is the most often played continuation for Black, Topalov overprotects his e-pawn, which frees up his queen's knight to hassle Kamsky's bishop via ...Na5. 8.c3 The most often played continuation, allowing the bishop to escape and attack by the Black knight (ie....8...Na5). 8...0-0 The most often played continuation. 9.h3 Kamsky spends a tempo in order to prevent Topalov from playing ....Bg4. 9...Bb7 This move defines the variation of the Ruy Lopez being played, it is known as the Flohr-Zaitsev variation, used by Karpov in many games of his WC matches with Kasparov. Zaitsev is one of Karpov's trainers. This variation leads to very sharp tactical play. Black's ambitious plan is to obstruct the classic Spanish manoeuvre Nf1-g3 by exerting rapid pressure on e4. The counterpoint to this plan is that White gains immediate attacking chances, but if Black can defend successfully then his queenside majority is often decisive. 10.d4 The main continuation attacking in the center, and opening the d2-square so Kamsky can complete the development of his minor pieces. 10...Re8 The most popular continuation. The idea behind this move is to give more protection to his e-pawn by playing the retreat ....Bf8. 11.Nbd2 Developing another minor piece. 11...Bf8 Spending a tempo to overprotect his e-pawn. 12.Ng5 A less-popular contination. Kamsky creates a double attack against Topalov's f-pawn. [Analysis:The main line is: 12.a4 h6 13.Bc2 exd4 14.cxd4 Nb4 15.Bb1 c5 16.d5 Nd7 17.Ra3 f5 18.Nh2 Nf6 19.Rf3 Re5 20.Rxf5 Rxf5 21.exf5 Bxd5 22.Ng4 Bf7] 12...Re7 Almost always played in this position, Topalov is forced to spend a tempo to defend his f-pawn. 13.d5 Attacking Topalov's knight, winning a tempo.This move also results in the center of the board becoming closed,which means that until Topalov moves his knight and plays ....c6 the center will stay closed. 13...Nb8 Topalov intends to move this knight to d7 immediately. [Analysis:In my database of games the move 13...Na5 is the most popular continuation, with play most often continuing: 14.Bc2 c6 15.b4 Nc4 16.Nxc4 bxc4 17.dxc6 Bxc6 18.Qe2 h6 19.Nf3 Rc8] 14.Nf1 The most popular continuation, allowing him to develop his dark-squared bishop. 14...Nbd7 Topalov redevelops his knight, now his knights mutually support each other. [Analysis:In my database, the move 14...h6 is more popular: 15.Nf3 c6 16.Ne3 (16.dxc6 Nxc6 17.Ng3 (17.Ne3) ) 16...Re8 (16...Rc7) ] 15.Ng3 The only move White has played in this position in my database,threatening Nf5. 15...g6 Preventing Kamsky from playing Nf5. [Analysis:According to my database the moves 15...h6 ; and 15...Nc5 have also been played in this position.] 16.Bc2N This move is a theoretical novelty for the position,Kamsky overprotects his e-pawn at the cost of making the bishop extremely passive. [Analysis:Prior to this game only the move 16.Be3 had been played:3 games the first between Romanishin and Beliavsky, in 1979 1-0] 16...h6 Forcing back the knight which wins a tempo. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3 preferred to play 16...Re8 with a possible continuation being: 17.Be3 Nb6 18.Qe2 h6 19.Nf3 c6 20.dxc6 Bxc6 21.Bb3 a5 22.a3 a4 23.Ba2 Nc4 =] 17.Nf3= The only free square the knight can be moved to. Deep Rybka 3 evaluates this position as equal. 17...Nb6 Topalov moves the knight to b6 instead of d7 because he wants to move his queen to d7 in the immediate future. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:Preferred to play 17...Re8 with this continuation possible: 18.Be3 c6 19.dxc6 Bxc6 20.Qd2 Kh7 21.Red1 Qc7 22.Nh2 Nc5 23.Ng4 Nxg4 24.hxg4 a5 =] 18.h4 Kamsky prevents Topalov from advancing his g-pawn to g5. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:The program gave a better evaluation to the move 18.a4: >=18.a4 Bg7 19.a5 Nbd7 20.Be3 Rc8 21.Qd2 Qf8+/=] 18...Qd7 Topalov plays this move in order to allow him to move his queen's rook to f8 in the near future (after his dark-squared bishop is moved to g7). [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 18...Re8 19.h5 g5 20.b3 Bc8 21.Nh2 Rb8 22.Be3 Qe7 23.Qd2 Bg7 =] 19.Nh2 Kamsky intends to move this knight to f1 and then to e3 in the immediate future. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 19.h5 Ree8 20.a4 Nxa4 21.Bxa4 bxa4 22.hxg6 fxg6+/=] 19...Bg7 Indirectly overprotecting his e-pawn. 20.h5 Threatening hxg6 gaining a half-open h-file. [Analysis:Rybka 3: 20.h5 Rf8 21.b3 c5 22.Be3 Qc8 23.Qd2 Kh7 24.Bd3 Qc7 +=] 20...Rf8 Transferring the rook to the kingside where it can be used to defend his position there. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 20...c5 21.Nf3 Rf8 22.Nh4 Qe8 23.a4 Rc7 24.Qf3 Nh7 25.axb5 axb5 26.Nf1 Bc8 27.hxg6 fxg6 28.Qe2 Ng5 +/=] 21.Nhf1 Intending to move the knight to e3. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: >=21.b3 Ree8 22.Be3 Rd8 23.Qd2 Kh7 24.Qe2 Rb8 =] 21...c6 Threatening to win a pawn after 22...cxd5 23.exd5 B or N xd5. 22.dxc6 [22.Ne3 Rfe8 23.dxc6 Qxc6 24.a4 Nxa4 25.Rxa4!? bxa4 26.Bxa4 Qc7 27.Bxe8 Rxe8+/=] 22...Qxc6 [Analysis:Worse is 22...Bxc6 23.b3 Re6 24.Ba3 Rd8 25.Ne3 d5 26.hxg6 fxg6 27.exd5 Nfxd5 28.Ne4 Ree8 +=] 23.Ne3= Deep Rybka evaluates this position as equal (=). [Better is 23.Qd3 d5 24.hxg6 fxg6 25.exd5 Nbxd5 26.f3 Qc5+ 27.Be3 Nxe3 28.Qxe3 Qxe3+ 29.Rxe3 Nd5 30.Rd3 Nf4 31.Rd6 Rf6 32.Rxf6 Bxf6+/=] 23...Kh7 Overprotecting his g-pawn at the cost of placing his king on the same diagonal as Kamsky's white-squared bishop. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:(a) 23...Rd8 24.Qd3 Rc7 25.hxg6 fxg6 26.Nd5 Nfxd5 27.exd5 Qxd5 28.Qxd5+ Nxd5 29.Bxg6 Ne7 30.Bc2 Kf7+/=; (b)Better is 23...d5 24.hxg6 fxg6 25.exd5 Nfxd5 26.Nxd5 Nxd5 27.Be4 Qe6 =] 24.Qf3 Kamsky is forced to spend a tempo to prevent the loss of his triple-attacked e-pawn. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: >=24.a4 Nxa4 (24...bxa4 25.Bxa4 Nxa4 26.Rxa4 Rb8+/=) 25.Bxa4 bxa4 26.Rxa4 Rb8 27.Qc2 Rd7 28.Rc4 Qb6 29.Nd5 Bxd5 30.exd5 Nxd5 31.b4 Ne7 32.hxg6+ fxg6 with sufficient compensation for the pawn.] 24...Bc8 Placing the bishop where it has more mobility.In addition Topalov might have plans of playing ...g6-g5-g4. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 24...Rd7 25.Rd1 d5 26.exd5 Nbxd5 27.Nxd5 Rxd5 28.Rxd5 Qxd5 29.Qxd5 Nxd5 +=] 25.Rd1 Occupying the half-open d-file which gives the rook more mobility. Because of this move Kamsky can play a knight to d5 in the future if he desires to. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 25.Rd1 Be6 26.Bb3 Bc8 27.Qe2 Rd8 28.Qd3 a5 29.Bc2 Be6 30.b3 Red7 =] 25...Be6 Topalov overprotects the d5-square which makes it impossible for Kamsky to play Nd5 in the future. 26.b3!? Preventing...Nc4, however this leaves his c-pawn enprise, in other words Kamsky is offeringa pawn sacrifice. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:The program gave a better evaluation to the move >=26.Bb3 with a possible continuation being: 26... 26...Qd7 27.Bxe6 Qxe6 28.Nd5 Nbxd5 29.exd5 Qc8 30.a4 Qc4 31.axb5 axb5 32.Ra6 Rd8 +=] 26...Qxc3 27.Bd2 Winning a tempo for his pawn.Deep Rybka evaluates that Kamsky has sufficient compensation for the pawn. 27...Qc7© 28.Ba5 Pinning Topalov's knight against his queen. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 28.Rac1 Rc8 29.Nd5 Bxd5 30.exd5 Qb8 31.Bb4 Rxc2 !? 32.Rxc2 e4 33.Qf4 Re5 34.Qc1 Nfxd5 35.Bc3 Nxc3 36.hxg6+ fxg6 37.Rxc3 Nd5 +=] 28...Qb8 Breaking the pin against his knight at the cost of a tempo. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3 gives black an advantage after 28...Rd7 ie. 29.Rac1 Qb7 30.Qe2 Rc8 31.Qf1 Kh8 32.Qe2 d5 33.Nxd5 Nbxd5 34.exd5 Nxd5 35.Be4 Rxc1 36.Rxc1 g5 with sufficient compensation for the pawn.] 29.Rd2 Intending to double his rooks on the d-file. 29...Nc8 30.Rad1 [Better is >=30.Rc1 Ra7 31.Nd5 Bxd5 32.exd5 Ne7 33.Be4 Rc8=] 30...b4 [Better is >=30...Rd7 31.Nd5 Bxd5 32.exd5 Qa7 33.hxg6+ fxg6 34.Bxg6+!? Kxg6 35.Bb6!? Nxb6 36.Qf5+ Kf7 37.Qe6+ Kg6=] 31.Qe2+/= Kh8? a mistake [>=31...Rd7 32.Bd3 Ne7 33.hxg6+ fxg6 34.Bc4 Bxc4 35.Nxc4 d5!? 36.exd5 Rxd5 37.Bb6 Qb7© with sufficient compensation for the pawn.] 32.Bd3+/- Na7 33.Rc1 [Better is >=33.Rc2 Rc8 34.Bxa6 Rxc2 35.Qxc2 Kh7 36.f3 Nb5 37.Bxb4 Nd4 38.hxg6+ fxg6+/-] 33...Nb5 [Better is >=33...Rc8 34.Rxc8+ Bxc8 35.Nd5 Nxd5 36.exd5 e4 37.hxg6 Qb7+/=] 34.Bxb5 axb5 35.Bxb4 Rd7 36.Rc6 Rfd8 37.Qd1 [Better is 37.f3 d5 38.hxg6 Qb7 39.Rc5 dxe4 40.Rxd7 Qxd7 41.gxf7 exf3 42.Qxf3 Qxf7+/-] 37...Bf8 [Better is 37...Qb7 38.Qc2 Bf8 39.Nd5 Bxd5 40.exd5 Kg7 41.hxg6 fxg6+/-] 38.Qc2 [Better is 38.Rdc2 Kh7 39.Qf3 Be7 40.Ba5 Rf8 41.Qe2 Qa8+-] 38...Kh7 39.Ba5 [Better is 39.Nd5 Bxd5 40.exd5 Qb7 41.Qd3 Be7 42.a3 Kg7 43.Rdc2 Qa7+/-] 39...Re8 40.hxg6+ [Better is >=40.Nd5 Bxd5 41.exd5 Qa8 42.Bb6 e4 43.a4 bxa4 44.bxa4 Nxh5 45.Nxh5 gxh5 46.a5+/-] 40...fxg6 41.Bc7 [Better is 41.Nd5 Bxd5 42.exd5 Be7 43.Ne4 Nxe4 44.Qxe4 Bd8+/-] 41...Qb7 42.Bxd6+/= Bf7 43.Bb4 [Better is >=43.Bxf8 Rxd2 44.Qc1 Rxf8 45.Rxf6 Rfd8 46.Ngf1 R2d6 47.Nf5 gxf5 48.Qxh6+ Kg8[] 49.Rxd6 Rxd6 50.Qxd6 Qxe4 51.Qb8+ Kg7[] 52.Qxb5+/-] 43...Bxb4 44.Rxd7 Qxd7 45.Rxf6+/- Re6 46.Nd5 Bf8 47.Rf3 [47.Rxe6 Qxe6 48.Qc7 Kg7 49.Qb7 Qd6 50.b4 Qd8 51.Qxb5+-] 47...Kg7 48.Rc3 Ra6 49.Rc7 Qd6 [>=49...Qe8 50.Qe2 Bd6 51.a4! Ra5 (51...Bxc7? 52.Nxc7 Qc8 53.Nxa6 bxa4 54.bxa4+-) 52.Rb7+- Qc6 53.Rxb5 Rxb5 54.Qxb5 Qxb5 55.axb5+/-] 50.Qe2 [50.Rb7 Qc6 51.Qxc6 Rxc6 52.Rxb5 Rc1+ 53.Nf1 Ba3+-] 50...Kg8 51.Qxb5 [51.Rb7 Qc6 52.Rxb5 Rxa2 53.Ne7+ Bxe7 54.Rb8+ Kg7 55.Qxa2] 51...Rxa2 52.Qb7 [>=52.Rc6 Qd8 53.Nf6+ Kh8 54.Qxe5 Qd2 55.Ng4+ Kg8 56.Nf1 Qg5 57.Nf6+ Kg7 58.Qd4] 52...Ra1+ 53.Kh2 Bxd5 54.exd5 Qf6 55.Qc8 Qh4+ 56.Qh3 Qxh3+ 57.Kxh3 Rd1 58.Ne4 Ba3 59.Ra7 Bb4 60.Rb7 Ba3 61.f3 [61.b4 Rd4 62.Nf6+ Kf8 63.b5 Rf4 64.Ng4 Rf5 65.b6 e4 66.g3 Rxd5 67.Rh7 Rh5+ 68.Kg2 Rb5 69.b7 Bd6 70.Nf6 Be5 71.Nd7+ Kg8 72.Re7 Rxb7 73.Nf6+ Bxf6 74.Rxb7] 61...Kf8 62.Rb5 [62.Nf6 Be7 63.Nd7+ Ke8 64.Nxe5 Rh1+ 65.Kg4 h5+ 66.Kf4 Bd6 67.Rb6 Ke7 68.Kg5 Bxe5 69.Re6+ Kd7 70.Rxe5 Kd6 71.Re6+ Kxd5 72.Rxg6] 62...h5 63.Kg3 [>=63.b4 Rd4 64.Rb8+ Ke7 65.d6+ Ke6 66.Re8+ Kf7 67.Re7+ Kf8 68.Re6 Kf7 69.Ng5+ Kf8 70.Rxg6+-] 63...Rc1? A mistake. [>=63...Be7 64.Rb8+ Kf7 65.d6 Bxd6 66.Rd8 Ke6 67.Nxd6 Rxd6 68.Rxd6+ Kxd6 69.Kh4+-] 64.Rb8+ [>=64.d6 Rd1 65.Rb6 Bc1 66.Kf2 Ba3 67.b4 Kf7 68.Nc5 Bxb4 69.Rxb4 Rxd6 70.Rb7+ Ke8 71.Ke3 Rc6 72.Nd3 Rc2 73.Rb2 Rxb2 74.Nxb2+-] 64...Kf7 65.Rb7+ Kf8 66.Kf2 [66.b4 Rh1 67.d6 Rd1 68.b5 Ke8 69.b6 Bxd6 70.Ra7 Bb8 71.Rh7 h4+ 72.Kh3 Rh1+ 73.Kg4 Kd8 74.Rh8+ Kd7 75.Rxb8 Kc6 76.Nd2 Kb5 77.Nc4 h3 78.gxh3 Rg1+ 79.Kh4 Kxc4 80.Rc8+ Kd4 81.b7 Rb1 82.b8Q Rxb8 83.Rxb8+-] 66...Rc2+ 67.Kf1 Rc1+ 68.Ke2 Rc2+ 69.Kd3 Rxg2 70.Ra7 Attacking the bishop winning a tempo. 70...Be7 The lost tempo. 71.d6 Again attacking the bishop, winning another tempo. 71...Bd8 Now the bishop serves as a blockader of Kamsky's dangerous passed d-pawn. [71...Bh4 72.Ra8+ Kf7 73.d7 Rg1 74.d8Q Bxd8 75.Rxd8 Rd1+ 76.Nd2 the only move 76...h4 77.Ke2 Rg1+-] 72.Nc5 Threatening Ne6+ forking Topalov's king and bishop. [Analysis:In this position Kamsky missed a better move: 72...Ra8: 72.Ra8 Ke8 73.Kc4 Kd7 74.Kd5 Rc2 75.Nc5+ Rxc5+ (75...Ke8?? 76.Ke6 Kf8 (76...Rxc5 77.d7+ Kf8 78.Rxd8+ Kg7 79.Rc8+-) 77.Rxd8+) 76.Kxc5 Bg5 77.Rg8 h4 78.Rxg6 Bd2 79.b4 Bxb4+ 80.Kxb4 Kc6 81.Kc4+-] 72...Ke8?? A blunder which decides the game. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:Better is 72...Bf6 73.b4 Rb2 74.Kc4 Rd2 75.Ne4 Rd4+ 76.Kc5 Bd8 77.Ra8 Ke8 78.Nf6+ Kf7 79.Nd7 Ke6 80.Nf8+ Kf7 81.Rxd8+-] 73.Rh7 Topalov resigned If 73...Ba5 74.d7+ Kf8 (If 74...Kd8?? then 75.Ne6# is checkmate.) 75.Ne6+ Kg8 (the only move) 77.b4 Bb6 78.Rf7 Rg1 79.Rf8+ Kh7 (the only move) 80.Kc4 Rd1 81.Rb8 Rxd7 (If 81...Bc7 82.Rb7 Rxd7 83.Nf8+ Kh6 84.Nxd7+-). 82.Nf8+ Kg7 83.Nxd7 is decisive +- [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:Better is 73.Rg7 e4+ 74.fxe4 Rg3+ 75.Ke2 Rg2+ 76.Kf3 Rd2 77.d7+ Rxd7 (77...Kf8?? 78.Ne6# checkmate) ] 1-0

You can play through the moves and analysis in the frame down below labelled Topalov-Kamsky game 4.

Game 5 will be played on Monday, with Topalov having the white pieces. (Sunday is a rest day).

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

Aeroflot Open:results round 2:section A1

Here are the results from round 2 for the top ten boards in section A1 at the Aeroflot Open:

(Wednesday, 18 February 2009)

Table White Flags Score Fed. Rating Black Flags Score Fed. Rating Result
1 GM Landa, Konstantin 1.0 RUS 2626 GM Naiditsch, Arkadij 1.0 GER 2693 ½-½
2 GM Lysyj, Igor 1.0 RUS 2620 GM Vitiugov, Nikita 1.0 RUS 2687 ½-½
3 GM Zhou, Jianchao 1.0 CHN 2612 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 1.0 UKR 2676 ½-½
4 GM Ghaem Maghami, Ehsan 1.0 IRI 2604 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 1.0 RUS 2664 ½-½
5 GM Onischuk, Alexander 1.0 USA 2659 GM Kurnosov, Igor 1.0 RUS 2602 0-1
6 GM Vaganian, Rafael A 1.0 ARM 2596 GM Aleksandrov, Aleksej 1.0 BLR 2636 ½-½
7 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 1.0 RUS 2636 GM Ehlvest, Jaan 1.0 USA 2595 ½-½
8 IM Ponkratov, Pavel 1.0 RUS 2557 GM So, Wesley 1.0 PHI 2627 1-0
9 GM Volkov, Sergey 1.0 RUS 2627 GM Smirnov, Pavel 1.0 RUS 2579 0-1
10 GM Bacrot, Etienne 0.5 FRA 2722 GM Shomoev, Anton 1.0 RUS 2567 1-0

Topalov wins game 2

Game 2 of the Candidates match to see who plays WC Anand for the WC title was played today in Bulgaria. The game started with Kamsky having the white pieces. He played the Ruy Lopez opening, and seemed to be surprised when Topalov responded with the Berlin Defense (made famous by Kramnik in his WC match victory over Kasparov). Kamsky seemed unprepared to meet this defense (even though according to my chessbase database he has played against it six times in his career), as he spent a great deal of time in the opening and middle game, which caused him to be in severe time pressure for much of the game. Kamsky had played a game in the variation which Topalov chose in this game (against Winants in 1992), but apparently Kamsky had forgotten how to proceed against this line. As a result, he not only lost any advantage he had, by playing White after drawing game one, but now he finds himself behind a game in the match with six games to go in the match. Tommorrow is a rest day, giving Kamsky time to regroup. I have posted analysis of this game below, I used Deep Rybka 3 to analyze this game. Strangely the program did not assign any ?! (dubious), or ? (mistake) annotations to any of Kamsky moves. This is in contrast to the analysis of this game done by GM Marin at the chessbase.com website (link: http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=5218). Game 3 in the match will be played on Thursday. Will Topalov once again play the Queen's Gambit, and will Kamsky once again essay the Grunfeld Defense? Stay tuned.

Aeroflot Open:pairings round 2:section A1

Here are the pairings for the top boards for round 2 of the top A1 section at the Aeroflot Open in Moscow.

Pairings round 2 (Tuesday, 17 February 2009)

Table White Flags Score Fed. Rating Black Flags Score Fed. Rating Result
1 GM Landa, Konstantin 1.0 RUS 2626 GM Naiditsch, Arkadij 1.0 GER 2693
2 GM Lysyj, Igor 1.0 RUS 2620 GM Vitiugov, Nikita 1.0 RUS 2687
3 GM Zhou, Jianchao 1.0 CHN 2612 GM Moiseenko, Alexander 1.0 UKR 2676
4 GM Ghaem Maghami, Ehsan 1.0 IRI 2604 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 1.0 RUS 2664
5 GM Onischuk, Alexander 1.0 USA 2659 GM Kurnosov, Igor 1.0 RUS 2602
6 GM Vaganian, Rafael A 1.0 ARM 2596 GM Aleksandrov, Aleksej 1.0 BLR 2636
7 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 1.0 RUS 2636 GM Ehlvest, Jaan 1.0 USA 2595
8 IM Ponkratov, Pavel 1.0 RUS 2557 GM So, Wesley 1.0 PHI 2627
9 GM Volkov, Sergey 1.0 RUS 2627 GM Smirnov, Pavel 1.0 RUS 2579
10 GM Bacrot, Etienne 0.5 FRA 2722 GM Shomoev, Anton 1.0 RUS 2567

Aeroflot Open begins in Moscow

One of the largest swiss-format chess tournaments of the year has begun in Moscow. The players have been divided up into four sections based upon their rating: A1,A2,B and C: Some of the strongest chess players in the world are participating in this tournament.Here is a list of players who won their first round game in the top A1-section:GM Naiditsch, GM Vitiugov,GM Moiseenko, GM Tomashevsky,GM Onischuk, GM Zvjaginsev, GM So, GM Volkov, GM Landa,GM Lysyj, GM Ghaem Maghami, GM Kurnosov, GM Vaganian, GM Ehlvest,GM Smirnov, GM Shomoev, and IM Ponkratov. GM Smirnov defeated former World Chess Champion Candidate Alex Dreev in round one, in a complex Richter-Rauzer variation of the Sicilian Defense. I have annotated this game using the chess program Deep Rybka 3 and present it below for you to play through. I hope you enjoy this analysis!

Tuesday, February 17, 2009

Analysis of game one:Topalov versus Kamsky

Here is my analysis in html format if you desire it:


Topalov,Veselin - Kamsky,Gata [D87]
World Chess Challenge - candidates fina Sofia (1), 17.02.2009
[Deep Rybka 3]

Opening:Grunfeld Defense:Exchange variation 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 The Queen's Gambit. 2...g6 3.Nc3 d5!? This move defines the defense being played by Kamsky,it is the Grunfeld Defense, a hypermodern opening, which allows White to create a large pawn center, which will be attacked by Black using piece play and pawns.I give this move a !?, because I find it surprising that Kamsky would chose this defense, as he has not had much success using it (especially in his match against Karpov in Elista). 4.cxd5 In his book "The Complete Grunfeld" GM Suetin calls this move, which initiates the "Exchange variation" of this opening, the "acid test" of the Grunfeld. 4...Nxd5 Regaining the pawn, however the knight has been deflected from the kingside for defensive purposes. 5.e4 The main continuation, attacking Kamksy's knight forcing the American to make a decision about the future of the knight in this game. 5...Nxc3 A move almost always played by Black in this position, forcing Topalov to accept an isolated a-pawn. 6.bxc3 Bg7 The main line,Kamsky intends to use this move in conjuntion with ...c5 in order to pressure Topalov's pawn center. 7.Bc4 Topalov develops his king's bishop before his king's knight, because he intends to develop the king knight to e2 to support his pawns. From c4 the white bishop attacks the f7-weakness in Kamsky's position. 7...c5 This pawn advance is the most popular move for White in this position. Kamsky pressures Topalov's pawn center even more.This pawn advance also allows him to develop his queen's knight behind his c-pawn at c6. 8.Ne2! Suetin gives this move a ! in his book "The Complete Grunfeld". Topalov reinforces his d and c-pawns, and prepares to castle on the kingside. 8...Nc6 The most often-played continuation. Kamsky catches up in minor piece development. He now has three of his pieces and pawns directed at Topalov's d-pawn. 9.Be3 A move almost always played in this position by the first player. Topalov completes the development of his minor pieces. A second piece of his is used to support his pawn center.Topalov plans to play Rc1, followed by d5. 9...0-0 The most often played move in this position for the player of the Black pieces. 10.0-0 Also the most popular continuation for White. 10...Na5 This idea has been rarely played by Black. Perhaps Kamsky wanted to avoid Topalov's preparations for the more critical variations of this line of play. GM Suetin, in regards to this move states, "This manoeuvre occurs much more frequently, after the preparatory 10...Bg4 11.f3,;the slight weakening of the g1-a7 diagonal is tactically important for Black's counterplay." [Analysis:Three moves are more often used in this position for Black:(a) 10...Qc7 ; (b) 10...Bg4 ; and (c) 10...cxd4 ] 11.Bd3 According to the chessbase online database,this is the main continuation in this position. Topalov tries to lure Kamsky into advancing the black c-pawn to c4. 11...b6 This pawn advance is the most often played response to White's last move. Kamsky advances the pawn to give his c-pawn support.This move also gives Kamsky the option of developing his light-squared bishop to b7 or even a6 in the future. 12.Qd2 Topalov develops his queen, which now forms a battery with his dark-squared bishop to pressure Kamsky's dark-squared bishop. In addition now both of Topalov's rooks are connected. [Analysis:According to the chessbase online database the move 12.Rc1 is the most often played continuation, with play usually following this course: 12...Qc7 13.Qd2 Rd8 14.Bh6 Bh8 15.Qe3 e6 16.e5 (16.Bg5 Rf8) 16...Bb7] 12...e5 Kamsky creates a triple attack against Topalov's d-pawn, threatening to win a pawn and a tempo after 13....cxd4 14.cxd4 exd4. [Analysis:The main line in this position continues: 12...Bb7 13.Bh6 cxd4 14.Bxg7 Kxg7 15.cxd4 e6 16.Rac1 Qe7 17.Qf4 Rac8 18.h4 Nc6 19.h5 e5] 13.Bh6 Topalov threatens to capture on g7, which would weaken Kamksy's king and also weaken his pawn center. [Analysis:According to the chessbase online database these other moves have also been tried in this position by White: 13.d5 ; 13.dxc5; 13.dxe5; 13.Rad1; Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 13.Bg5 f6 14.Be3 f5 15.dxe5 Bxe5 16.f4 Bg7 17.e5 Be6=] 13...cxd4 [Analysis:According to the chessbase online database, these other moves have also been tried by Black in this position:(a) 13...exd4 14.cxd4 cxd4 15.Bxg7 Kxg7 =; and (b) 13...f6 ] 14.Bxg7N Analysis:According to the chessbase online database this capture is a theoretical novelty for the position. [Analysis:Prior to this game the only move white had used in this position was 14.cxd4 Galvan Huar...-Perez Garcia 2008, 1-0, Cheparinov-Kamsky 2008, 1-0, and Golichenko-Shishkin, 2008, 1-0] 14...Kxg7 15.cxd4 Forcing Kamsky to accept an isolated pawn on d4. 15...exd4 16.f4 Preparing the advance of his e-pawn to e5. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 16.Qb2 Qf6 17.f4 Bb7 18.Nxd4 Rfd8 19.e5 Qe7 20.Be2 Nc6 21.Nb5 Ba6 22.a4 Bxb5 23.axb5 Nd4=] 16...f6 Contesting the advance of the white e-pawn. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:(a) 16...Qd6 17.f5 Rg8 18.Rae1 Re8 19.e5!? Rxe5 20.f6+ Kg8 21.Qh6 Qf8 22.Qf4 Re3 23.Qxd4 Qc5 24.Qxc5 bxc5 with sufficient compensation for the pawn.; (b) 16...Bg4 17.f5 Bxe2 18.f6+ Kh8 19.Bxe2 Rc8 20.Rad1 Nc4 21.Qxd4 Qxd4+ 22.Rxd4 Ne3=] 17.e5 Topalov offers to exchange pawns on e5 and gains space. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:(a) 17.Rac1 Qd6 18.f5 Bd7 19.Nf4 g5 20.e5!? Qxe5 21.Ne6+ Bxe6 22.Rfe1 Qd6 23.Rxe6 Qa3=/+; (b) 17.f5 Qd6 18.Rad1 Qe5 19.Rf3 Bd7 20.Ba6 Rae8 21.Qxd4 Rf7 22.Qxe5 Rxe5=] 17...Bd7 Activating his bishop, while leaving his d-pawn enprise. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:(a) 17...Bg4 18.Rae1 Rc8 19.exf6+ Rxf6 20.Ba6 Rc7 21.Qxd4 Nc6 22.Qxd8 Nxd8 23.Ng3 Nf7=; (b) 17...Qd5 18.Ng3 (18.f5 Qxe5 19.Rae1 Qe3+ 20.Qxe3 dxe3 21.fxg6 hxg6 22.Nf4 Re8=) ] 18.exf6+ [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:The program gave a better evaluation to the capture: 18.Nxd4 with a possible continuation being: 18... 18...Nc6 19.Nf3 fxe5 (19...Bg4 20.Rac1 Rc8 21.Qe3 Bxf3 22.Rxf3 fxe5 23.Ba6 Rc7 24.Bb5 Rf6 25.Bxc6 Qd4 26.fxe5 Qxe3+ 27.Rxe3 Rfxc6 28.Rf1 Rc1=/+) 20.Qc3 Bg4!? 21.Qxc6 Qxd3 22.Nxe5 Qd4+ 23.Kh1 Be2 24.Rfe1 Rae8 25.h3 Re7 26.Qc2 Ba6=] 18...Qxf6= Deep Rybka 3 evaluates this position as equal. 19.Ng3 Preparing to advance his f-pawn. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 19.f5 gxf5 (Worse is 19...Bxf5 20.g4 Rac8 21.gxf5 Nc4 22.Bxc4 Rxc4 23.fxg6 Qxg6++/-) 20.Ng3 Kh8 21.Bxf5 Bxf5 22.Nxf5 Nc6 23.Rf4 Qe5 24.Raf1 Rf6=/+] 19...Kh8 Kamsky spends a tempo to place his king in a more secure location. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:(a) 19...Nc6 20.f5 Qe7 21.Rae1 Ne5 22.Ba6 Rae8 23.Qxd4 Bxf5 24.Bb5 Bd7 25.Rxf8 Kxf8 26.Rxe5 Qxe5 27.Qxd7 Qc5+ =; (b) 19...Rae8 20.f5 Qh4 21.Rac1 Nc6 (21...Bc6 22.Rf4 Qg5 23.Rcf1 Re5 24.Qb2 Rd8 25.fxg6 hxg6) 22.Rf4 Qe7 23.Re4 Ne5 24.Rxd4 Nxd3 25.Rxd3 Bb5 26.Rd5 a6=] 20.f5 Creating the threat of 21.fxg5. 20...gxf5 Leaving Kamsky up two pawns. 21.Bxf5 Regaining a pawn and alllowing further simplification of the position/ [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 21.Nxf5 Rae8 22.Rf4 Qe5 23.Re4 Qf6 24.Rf4 Qe5=] 21...Bxf5 22.Rxf5 Regaining his piece and winning a tempo with the attack against Kamsky's Queen. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 22.Nxf5 Nc6 23.Rad1 (Worse is 23.Rf4 Qe5 24.Re1 Qa5 25.Qxa5 bxa5 26.Rc1 Nb4 27.Rf3 d3 28.a3 Na6 29.Nd4 Nc5=/+) 23...Rad8 24.h3 Qg6 25.g4 h5 26.Qf4 Rde8=] 22...Qd6 Kamsky of course had to move his queen to a square where it would still protect his passed d-pawn. 23.Raf1 Topalov forces Kamsky to keep his queen defending the double attacked rook on f8. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:(a) 23.Ne4 Qd7 24.Rxf8+ Rxf8 25.Rd1 Rf5 26.Qxd4+ Qxd4+ 27.Rxd4 Kg7 28.Rd7+ Rf7[] (the only move) with an equal position.; (b) 23.Qd3 Nc6 24.Rc1 Rg8 25.Rh5 Rg6 26.Nf5 Qf4 27.Re1 Qg4 28.Ng3 Rag8=] 23...Nc6 Overprotecting his d-pawn. 24.Ne4 Attacking Kamsky's queen threatening to win at least a tempo. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 24.Qc1 Rxf5 25.Nxf5 Qg6 26.h3 Rd8 27.Nh6 Re8 28.Nf7+ Kg7 29.Nh6 Kh8 =] 24...Qe7 Avoiding the loss of a tempo and threatening to win one by attacking Topalov's knight. 25.Qh6 Triple attacking Topalov's rook,threatening to win a rook via exchanges on f8. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 25.Rxf8+ Rxf8 26.Rxf8+ Qxf8 27.Qc1 Ne7 28.Qc7 Ng8 (28...Nc8 29.Ng5 Ne7 30.Qd6 Qg7=) ] 25...Rxf5 Simplying the position. 26.Rxf5 Topalov wins a tempo as Kamky's knight is enprise. 26...Ne5 The lost tempo. 27.h3 Topalov creates luft for his king and secures the h4 square. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 27.Qd2 d3 28.Nf2 Re8 29.Nxd3 Nxd3!? 30.Qxd3 Qe3+ 31.Qxe3 Rxe3 32.a4 (32.Rf7 Ra3 33.Rf2 b5 =/+) 32...Ra3 33.Rf4 Kg7 =] 27...Ng6 Creating a discovered attack against Topalov's knight.threatening to win a least a tempo. Deep Rybka 3 evaluates this position as =/+. 28.Rh5 Creating the threat of 29.Qxf6. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3:Another idea is to play 28.Nf6: 28.Nf6 with a possible continuation being: 28...Qg7 (28...Qe3+ 29.Qxe3 dxe3 30.Kf1 Rc8 31.Ng4 Kg7 32.Nxe3 Rc1+ 33.Ke2 Ra1 34.Kd3 Rxa2 35.Nc2 Nf8 =/+) 29.Qxg7+ Kxg7 30.Nh5+ Kh6 31.Rd5 d3 32.Nf6 Nf4 33.Rd6 Kg5 34.g3 Ne2+ 35.Kg2 h5 36.Nd7 h4 37.gxh4+ Kxh4=/+] 28...Rg8 [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 28...Kg8 !? 29.Nd6 (29.Nf6+!? Qxf6 30.Qxh7+ Kf8 (the only move) 31.Rh6 Re8 32.Rxg6 Re1+ 33.Kh2 Qe5+ 34.Rg3 Re3 35.Qg8+ Ke7 -/+ the only move) 29...Qe3+ 30.Qxe3 dxe3 31.Kf1 Rd8 32.Rd5 Ne7 33.Rg5+ Kf8 34.Nc4 Rd1+ 35.Ke2 Rc1 36.Nxe3 Ra1 37.Kf3 Rxa2 38.Rh5 Kg7 =/+] 29.Nf6 Threatening Qxh7+ Deep Rybka evaluates this position as equal (=) 29...Rg7 30.Nxh7 Regaining his pawn. 30...Rxh7 31.Qxg6 Creating a position of material equality. 31...Qe3+ winning a tempo. 32.Kf1 The lost tempo. [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 32.Kh1 Rxh5 33.Qxh5+ Kg7 (the only move) 34.Qg4+ Kf6 35.Qh4+ Kf7 =] 32...Qc1+ [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 32...Rxh5 33.Qxh5+ Kg7 34.Qg4+ Kh7 35.Qf5+ Kg8 36.Qg4+ Kh7 =] 33.Kf2 [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 33.Ke2 d3+!? 34.Qxd3 Qb2+ 35.Kf3 Rxh5 36.Qd8+ Kh7 37.Qd3+ (37.Qe7+ Kg6 38.Qe8+ Kh6 39.Qe6+ Kh7 40.Qe4+ Kh6 41.Qe6+ Kh7 42.Qe4+ Kh6=) 37...Kh6 38.Qd6+ And white could draw the game by perpetually checking the black king.] 33...Qd2+ 34.Kg3 Qe3+ 35.Kh2 Now Topalov threatens to checkmate Kamsky by playing 36.Qxh7# 35...Qf4+ [Analysis:Deep Rybka 3: 35...Rxh5 36.Qxh5+ Kg7 37.Qg4+ Kf6 (37...Kf7 38.Qd7+ Kf6 39.Qd6+ Kf5 40.Qd5+ Qe5+ 41.Qxe5+ Kxe5 =) 38.Qg3 Qe5 39.Qxe5+ Kxe5 40.Kg3 a5 =/+] 36.Kg1 Qc1+ The game was drawn at this point. 1/2-1/2

Candidates final begins:Topalov-Kamsky game one draw

The eight-game match between Veselin Topalov and Gata Kamsky began in Sofia, Bulgaria today. GM Topalov began the game by playing the Queen's Gambit, and Kamsky in an 8 game match, and Kamsky decided to challenge Topalov right from the start of game one by playing the Grunfeld Defense, an aggressive hypermodern opening, which he had little success with in his match against Karpov in Elista. Topalov chose to play the Exchange variation of the Grunfeld,which is considered to be the "acid-test" of this opening. The two players played moves known to modern opening theory until move 14, when Topalov played the theoretical novelty 14.Bxg7. Prior to this game, according to the chessbase online database, white had only played the move 14.cxd4. Topalov is going to have to come up with some other ideas than he used in this game, if he is going to make any headway against the Grunfeld Defense. Will Topalov open with 1.d4 in game 3 and will Kamsky play the Grunfeld Defense again if Topalov does play 1.d4? Stay tuned. I have posted analysis of this game which I created with the help of the World's strongest chess program Deep Rybka 3 using my multiprocessor computer. You can play through the moves and the analysis of this game I have created below on page one of my blog. Enjoy!

Monday, February 16, 2009

Rise in Malaria Rates, Drug Resistance Tied to Climate

We have all heard about the fact that many scientists believe our earth is warming. Although longitudinal data does not really exist to support the claims of these scientists,proof of the beliefs of these scientists exists today in our world. One example is that the vast sheets of ice in the Antarctic have been falling into the oceans at an alarming rate, unprecedented in our history.

Currently at the Scientific America website, a new article entitled "Rise in Malaria Rates, Drug Resistance Tied to Climate", can be read. Andrew McGlashen, the writer of this article states:

"Warmer temperatures are at least partly to blame for a surge in malaria in East Africa and the increase in drug-resistant strains of the disease, according to a University of Michigan researcher.

Some scientists have argued that climate is not involved in the increasing highland epidemics. Instead, they say, adaptations in the parasite that make it resistant to anti-malarial drugs are the key drivers.

But Pascual said that this "either-or" view is misguided and improperly lets global warming off the hook.

"I think that’s a useless discussion," she said.

More likely, Pascual said, the two work in tandem to an effect greater than the sum of their parts, with rising temperatures leading to faster development of drug resistance."

Hopefully, this scientists and other scientists who have pointed out the fact that global warming is occurring, will be listened to, so that we do not have to deal with a world full of diseases which have become drug-resistant due to global warming.

To read the entire article go to:http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=malaria-drug-resistance-climate

Wasps can sting because of an ancient virus


"The wasps' stings pack a punch partly due to paralyzing particles stripped out of an ancient virus, suggests a team led by Annie Bezier of France's Université François Rabelais."Many species of parasitoid wasps inject polydnavirus (virus-like) particles in order to manipulate host defenses and development," begins the study in the current Science magazine. Wasps use caterpillars for food, and inject their eggs into them so their growing young have a food source. The wasps also inject polydnavirus particles which paralyze the caterpillars, which allows the wasp embryos to eat from them until they kill the caterpillar and leave the caress to live out their predatory lives .Unlike real viruses, the particles don't reproduce after invading their host, and lack any genetic machinery to spawn. So, how did they get into wasps?

Bezier and colleagues opened up wasp ovaries (the calyx) of distantly-related parasitic wasps (specifically the cotesia congregata wasps), which prey particularly on young tobacco hookworms. The calyx is the only place the wasp makes the viral particles, before the particles are injecting into the caterpillar. Bezier and her associates found within the genes of the wasps the tools for reproducing the particles. And then these scientists compared those genes to known viruses, looking for a match, which they found within a family of viruses known to afflict moths, beetles, crickets and shrimp.

The researchers found that 22 calyx genes matched those from the moth virus family, with small differences suggesting they are remnants of an infection of an ancestral wasp about 100 million years ago. The researchers have "convincingly demonstrated" that this ancient virus inserted its genes into the DNA of the wasps, finds immunologist Donald Stoltz of Canada's Dalhousie University and entomologist James Whitfield of the University of Illinois, in a commentary accompanying the study.

"The authors solve a long-standing mystery, and at the same time establish a new paradigm in virology," add Stoltz and Whitfield, in a more congratulatory vein. Episodes of "horizontal" transfer of genes, wholesale borrowing of useful ones, are common among microbes, and genome researchers have long shown that animal genomes, including ours, are riddled with remnants of viral DNA that blundered their way into our genes and sometimes play useful roles, for example in the development of the placenta in pregnant women. But the wasp-virus incorporations "represent the only example, so far," say the study authors, of a creature lifting gene machinery that allows it to inject and fire off genes into another creature. The finding, they suggest, opens a new avenue for gene therapy.

More broadly, the virus finding reveals a new way for viruses and the hosts to make a living off each other, suggest Stoltz and Whitfield. The original virus doesn't seem to be around any more, but its genes live on in the belly of the wasp. "Were the (virus-like) polydnaviruses really viruses?" they ask? It all depends on how virologists define viruses, they conclude, something neglected in the most recent 1,259-page Virus Taxonomy: VIIIth Report, the bible of virology.

The more interesting lesson here for virologists and for evolutionary biologists may be that there is now reason to start thinking about virus-host relationships in much broader terms," adds the commentary. The wasp polydnavirus-style mutual back-scratching among viruses and their victims may be more common than previously supposed. "How did this kind of relationship arise?" they ask.

Sources:http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/323/5916/926 and

Accused in subway case battled with depression

Once again those of us who have to deal with depression on a daily basis, have been unfairly compared with people who have committed serious crimes in the World. The title of this blog entry is taken from the Globe and Mail website: The title of my blog entry refers to an incident in Toronto, Canada on February 13th,2009 in which a media-labelled "depressed" man who had stopped taking his antidepressant medication, allegedly "pushing two teenage boys into the path of an oncoming subway." In this same article, the writer of the article, CAROLINE ALPHONSO, writes:
"A man accused of pushing two teenage boys into the path of an oncoming subway train Friday afternoon lived a normal life up until a year ago, when he became depressed and started taking antidepressants, according to a person familiar with the case."

Later on in this same article, this writer states:
"The last incident of a fatal subway pushing was in 1997, when 23-year-old Charlene Minkowski was pushed at Dundas station by Herbert Cheong, a 41-year-old man with a 20-year history of mental illness."


Why do the media chose to use the term "mental illness" in relation to these incidents? Are these writers qualified to use such a term in an article they write? Apparently, they are not because most people who have a "mental illness", do not commit criminal acts against others. As stated at this website:http://karisable.com/crmh.htm:

"Mental illness and criminal insanity are two different concepts. Many people within our communities who come from all walks of life and levels of success are mentally ill. Research shows people in treatment for a mental illness are no more violent or dangerous than the the general population."

Someone has to begin to educate these writers and media types that people who commit these kinds of actions are criminally insane and not mentally ill! And I have taken up the challenge, and suggest that these writers who label people who commit criminal acts as being "mentally ill", do some research before they write the story, and get direct quotes from qualified medical professionals concerning the "conditions" the person is suffering from, rather than using the label "mentally ill" to describe them!

To read the full article of Caroline Alphonso, go to:http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20090215.wsubway16/BNStory/National/

Sunday, February 15, 2009

The Challenges of life: living with anxiety

As part of the human experience, we are often forced to accept and deal with challenges which confront us in our lives. Accepting these challenges can often be difficult for everyone. However, if you have an anxiety disorder like I have the challenges can often seem overwhelming. Often it is the anxiety itself rather than the challenge which is the most difficult aspect of the entire experience. However, due to new insight into the causes of anxiety and new medicines which can help people who have an anxiety disorder, those of us with this disorder can find successes in life and
like the rest of the world's population,we can begin to enjoy life rather than always worrying about what we are doing or what we have to do during a day. Some research on the internet proved interesting and cathartic for me because I found that some of the most famous people ever to have lived, and some of the most successful people ever, have had anxiety disorders like myself. Apparently, new scientific research indicates that anxiety and depression are highly correlated with creativity. Here is the list:

Abraham Lincoln (president - USA)
Al Kasha (songwriter)
Alanis Morisette (singer)
Alfred Lord Tennyson (poet)
Ann Wilson (singer)
Anne Tyler (author)
Anthony Hopkins (actor)
Aretha Franklin (singer)
Barbara Bush (former First Lady - U.S.)
Barbara Gordon (filmmaker)
Barbra Streisand (singer)
Beverly Johnson (supermodel)
Bonnie Raitt (musician)
Burt Reynolds (actor)
Carly Simon (singer)
Charles Schultz (cartoonist)
Charlotte Bronte (author)
Cher (singer, actress)
Courtney Love (singer - actress)
Dave Stewart of the (singer – Eurythmics)
David Bowie (singer)
Dean Cain (actor)
Deanna Carter (singer)
Dick Clark (television personality)
Donny Osmond (actor)
Earl Campbell (Heisman Trophy winner)
Edie Falco (actress)
Edvard Munch (artist)
Emily Dickinson (poet)
Eric Clapton (musician)
Goldie Hawn
Howard Stern (king of media)
Howie Mandel (comic)
Isaac Asimov (author)
James Garner (actor)
Jim Eisenreich (baseball)
Joan Rivers (actress)
John Candy (comedian)
John Cougar Mellencamp (musician, actor)
John Madden (announcer)
John Steinbeck (author)
John Stuart Mill (philosopher)
Johnny Depp (actor)
Kim Basinger (actress)
Lani O'Grady (actress)
Leila Kenzle (actress)
Marie Osmond (entertainer)
Marty Ingels (comedian)
Michael Crichton (writer)
Michael English (Gospel artist)
Michael Jackson (singer)
Naomi Campbell (model)
Naomi Judd (singer)
Nicholas Cage (actor)
Nicole Kidman (actress)
Nikola Tesla (inventor)
Olivia Hussey (actress)
Oprah Winfrey (host)
Pete Harnisch (baseball)
Ray Charles (musician)
Robert Burns (poet)
Robert McFarlane (former National Security Advisor - U.S.)
Robin Quivers (radio host)
Roseanne Barr (comedian)
Sally Field (actress)
Sam Shepard (playwright)
Shecky Greene (comedian)
Sheryl Crow (musician)
Sigmund Freud (psychiatrist)
Sir Isaac Newton (scientist)
Sir Laurence Olivier (actor)
Sissy Spacek (actress)
Susan Powter (tv host)
Tom Snyder (host)
Tony Dow (actor director)
W.B. Yeats (poet)
Willard Scott (weatherman)
Winona Ryder (actress)

Friday, February 13, 2009

Aeroflot Open 2009

One of the largest chess tournaments in the world is about to begin in Moscow. The Aeroflot Open Chess Festival, which attracts chess players from all over the world, will be held in February 2009 for the eighth time. Four Separate tournaments will be held, with some of the strongest players in the world participating in the A1 section. Each tournament is a nine round Swiss Tournament. The prize fund for the entire tournament is 180,000 Euros. The official tournament website for this tournament is http://www.aeroflotchess.com/ Eric Hansen from Canada is a participant in the A2 section, good luck Eric!

Wednesday, February 11, 2009

Topalov-Kamsky match analysis,past history

The big match is only days away. From a historical perspective, according to the official match website http://www.wccc2009.com/en/participants.html, Topalov and Kamsky have played eight games against each other in their professional chess careers with Topalov scoring 4 wins to none for Kamsky (four games have been drawn). Obviously, the fact that their game history is so lobsided in favor of Topalov, gives the Bulgarian quite an advantage entering the match. However, pressure will also be on Topalov, because as favorite to win the match, he will be expected to do so without having any serious difficulties with Kamsky. Two of these losses which Topalov inflicted upon Kamsky were when Kamsky played white. Here is a summary of these games:

Game 1:White:Kamsky Black:Topalov result:draw Opening:Symmetrical English ECO:A34 Number of Moves:61 Year of Game:1994 Tournament:Linares

Game 2:White:Topalov Black:Kamsky result:draw Opening:Queen's Indian Defense:Nimzowitch variation ECO:E12 Number of Moves:34 Year of Game:1994 Tournament:Las Palmas

Game 3:White:Kamsky Black:Topalov result:Topalov won Opening:Modern Benoni Defense, fianchetto variation ECO:A62 Number of Moves:49 Year of Game:1996 Dos Hermanos

Game 4:White:Topalov Black:Kamsky result:Topalov won Opening:Scandinavian (Center-Counter) Defense ECO:B01 Number of Moves:25 Year of Game:2006 Tournament:Corus

Game 5:White:Topalov Black:Kamsky result:Topalov won Opening: Slav Defense ECO:B15 Number of Moves:42 Year of game: 2006 Tournament:Sofia MTel Masters 2nd

Game 6:White:Kamsky Black:Topalov result:Topalov won Opening:Sicilian Defense,Najdorf variation:poisoned pawn ECO:B97 Number of Moves:29 Year of Game:2006 Tournament:Sofia MTel Masters 2nd

Game 7:White:Topalov Black:Kamsky result:draw Opening:Queen's Indian Defense:Nimzowitch variation ECO:B15 Number of Moves: 43 Year of Game:2007 Tournament:Sofia MTel Masters 3rd

Game 8:White:Kamsky Black:Topalov result:draw Opening:London system ECO:A46 Number of Moves:51 Sofia MTel Masters 3rd

Good luck to both players, lets hope the games are well-played.

Topalov - Kamsky Candidates Match approaches

The start of the eight-game match between GM Veselin Topalov and GM Gata Kamsky is almost here. The 8 game match begins on February 17th. Here is the schedule of games which is presented at the official match website:http://www.wccc2009.com/


February 17 - Game 1 from 15.00 EET (13.00 UTC)
February 18 - Game 2 from 15.00 EET (13.00 UTC)
February 19 - Rest Day
February 20 - Game 3 from 15.00 EET (13.00 UTC)
February 21 - Game 4 from 15.00 EET (13.00 UTC)
February 22 - Rest Day
February 23 - Game 5 from 15.00 EET (13.00 UTC)
February 24 - Game 6 from 15.00 EET (13.00 UTC)
February 25 - Rest Day
February 26 - Game 7 from 15.00 EET (13.00 UTC)
February 27- Game 8 from 15.00 EET (13.00 UTC)
February 28 - Tie Breaks

The winner of this match will play Viswanathan Anand for the World Chess Championship title later in the year.

Sunday, February 8, 2009

Linares 2009

Mark Crowther has released details about the 2009 edition of the Linares Chess tournament on his website at http://www.chesscenter.com/twic/twic.html. This year's tournament will only be held in Linares, Spain (unlike other years when the event was split between Linares and Morelia, Mexico). The tournament will be held from February 18th until March 8th 2009 and has a prize fund of 314,000 Eurodollars. Here is a list of participants in this year's tournament: Viswanathan Anand, Vassily Ivanchuk, Magnus Carlsen, Teimour Radjabov, Levon Aronian, Wang Yue, Alexander Grischuk and the Leinier Dominguez Perez.

Friday, February 6, 2009

Peter Svidler wins the Gibtelecom Masters Chess Festival

GM Peter Svidler won the Gibtelecom Chess Festival Masters section by defeating GM Vadim Milov in a playoff. Congratulations Peter! Unlike in other professional chess tournaments, where tie-break formulas are used to decide the winner of a tournament when two or more players tie for first at the end of the tournament, the Gibtelecom event uses a playoff format.

Here are the final standings of the top players in the Masters Section:

7th Gibtelecom Masters Caleta (ENG), 27 i-5 ii 2009
Final Round 10 Standings:
Rank Name Fed. Rating Score TPR
1 Svidler, Peter GM RUS 2723 8 2829
2 Milov, Vadim GM SUI 2669 8 2769
3 Gashimov, Vugar GM AZE 2723 7.5 2764
4 Nakamura, Hikaru GM USA 2699 7.5 2700
5 Berg, Emanuel GM SWE 2606 7.5 2648
6 Akobian, Varuzhan GM USA 2619 7.5 2640
7 Harikrishna, Pentala GM IND 2673 7 2694
8 Dzagnidze, Nana GM GEO 2518 7 2675
9 Sokolov, Ivan GM NED 2657 7 2626
10 Stefanova, Antoaneta GM BUL 2557 7 2612
11 Cramling, Pia GM SWE 2548 7 2511

Tuesday, February 3, 2009

Ranking for Female Players:Gibraltar Chess Festival Masters

Ranking after round 9 - Females

Rank Name Flags Score Fed. M/F Rating TPR W-We 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
18 GM Stefanova, Antoaneta w 5.5 BUL F 2557 2591 +0.40 1 1 0 1 ½ 1 0 1
24 GM Dzagnidze, Nana w 5.5 GEO F 2518 2645 +1.45 1 1 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½
33 GM Cramling, Pia w 5.0 SWE F 2548 2433 -1.00 0 1 1 1 1 0 ½ ½
36 IM Arakhamia-Grant, Ketevan w 5.0 SCO F 2500 2452 -0.36 1 0 1 ½ 1 0 1 ½
38 IM Cmilyte, Viktorija w 5.0 LTU F 2497 2433 -0.48 ½ 1 1 0 1 0 ½ 1
39 IM Zatonskih, Anna w 5.0 USA F 2462 2482 +0.28 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1
41 IM Sachdev, Tania w 5.0 IND F 2435 2334 -0.93 1 0 1 ½ ½ 0 1 1
43 IM Houska, Jovanka w 5.0 ENG F 2392 2469 +0.85 ½ 1 ½ 1 0 1 0 1
55 IM Krush, Irina w 4.5 USA F 2457 2440 +0.00 1 ½ 0 1 1 1 0 0
56 GM Socko, Monika w 4.5 POL F 2449 2325 -1.06 1 0 1 ½ 0 1 1 0
64 WGM Calzetta, Monica w 4.5 ESP F 2371 2341 -0.18 0 1 1 1 ½ 0 0 1
70 IM Klinova, Masha w 4.5 ISR F 2328 2234 -0.80 0 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½
138 WIM Tsifanskaya, Ludmila A w 3.0 ISR F 2149 2070 -1.00 ½ 0 1 0 ½ 1 0 0
155 Haug, Marianne Wold w 3.0 NOR F 1935 2006 +0.60 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 0 1 ½
159 Carlsen, Ellen Oen w 3.0 NOR F 1888 2066 +1.51 1 0 ½ 0 1 0 0 ½
178 Chidi, Lovinia Sylvia 2.0 GER F 0 1872 1872 0 1 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½

Gibtelecom Chess Festival Masters:Round 8 standings

Here are the standings for the top scoring players after 8 rounds of play in this tournament:

Rank Name Flags Score Fed. M/F Rating TPR W-We 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 GM Gashimov, Vugar
6.5 AZE M 2723 2794 +0.79 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½
2 GM Milov, Vadim
6.5 SUI M 2669 2741 +0.71 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1
3 GM Svidler, Peter
6.0 RUS M 2723 2765 +0.46 1 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½
4 GM Nakamura, Hikaru
6.0 USA M 2699 2657 -0.26 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1
5 GM Harikrishna, Pentala
6.0 IND M 2673 2716 +0.49 1 1 ½ 0 1 1 1 ½
6 GM Beliavsky, Alexander G
6.0 SLO M 2646 2713 +0.71 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 0 ½
7 GM Socko, Bartosz
6.0 POL M 2631 2742 +1.18 1 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1
8 GM Ganguly, Surya Shekhar
6.0 IND M 2614 2718 +1.10 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½
9 GM Lopez Martinez, Josep Manu
6.0 ESP M 2540 2637 +1.09 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½
10 GM Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime
5.5 FRA M 2696 2593 -0.87 1 ½ 0 1 1 ½ 1 ½
11 GM Berkes, Ferenc
5.5 HUN M 2651 2620 -0.29 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 0 1
12 GM Roiz, Michael
5.5 ISR M 2647 2635 -0.03 ½ 1 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½
13 GM Avrukh, Boris
5.5 ISR M 2645 2669 +0.30 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 0 ½
14 GM Gurevich, Mikhail
5.5 TUR M 2624 2641 +0.23 1 1 ½ 1 0 1 ½ ½
15 GM Akobian, Varuzhan
5.5 USA M 2619 2603 -0.06 1 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 ½
16 GM Berg, Emanuel
5.5 SWE M 2606 2572 -0.25 1 ½ ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1
17 GM Kotronias, Vasilios
5.5 GRE M 2603 2734 +1.46 1 1 1 1 ½ 0 1 0
18 GM Stefanova, Antoaneta w 5.5 BUL F 2557 2591 +0.40 1 1 0 1 ½ 1 0 1
19 GM Speelman, Jon S
5.5 ENG M 2536 2461 -0.61 0 1 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1
20 GM Del Rio De Angelis, Salvad
5.5 ESP M 2532 2525 +0.09 ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ 0 1
21 IM Hammer, Jon Ludvig
5.5 NOR M 2532 2560 +0.35 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½
22 IM Gordon, Stephen J
5.5 ENG M 2524 2533 +0.19 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1
23 GM Pavlovic, Milos
5.5 SRB M 2520 2460 -0.46 1 ½ 0 1 1 ½ 1 ½
24 GM Dzagnidze, Nana w 5.5 GEO F 2518 2645 +1.45 1 1 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½
25 IM Papp, Gabor
5.5 HUN M 2517 2553 +0.50 1 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 1 ½
26 IM Szabo, Krisztian
5.5 HUN M 2508 2513 +0.20 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 ½
27 IM Al Sayed, Mohamad N.
5.5 QAT M 2488 2551 +0.75 1 ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 ½
28 IM Kozlov, Oleg
5.5 RUS M 2187 2471 +2.87 0 1 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1
29 Lovik, Lasse Ostebo
5.5 NOR M 2184 2435 +2.32 0 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1

Visit GM Alexandra Kosteniuk's Women's Chess Blog:Please click on the image below:

Visit GM Alexandra Kosteniuk's Women's Chess Blog:Please click on the image below:
Chess needs more women and girl participants and administrators!

Thoughts worth thinking about

"Our subconscious minds have no sense of humor, play no jokes and cannot tell the difference between reality and an imagined thought or image. What we continually think about eventually will manifest in our lives."-Sidney Madwed



Laws alone can not secure freedom of expression; in order that every woman and man present their views without penalty, there must be spirit of tolerance in the entire population.- Albert Einstein Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. - Leo Buscaglia



A person's true wealth is the good he or she does in the world. - Mohammed



Our task must be to free ourselves... by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty. -Albert Einstein



The best way to find yourself, is to lose yourself in the service of others. - Ghandi



The unselfish effort to bring cheer to others will be the beginning of a happier life for ourselves. - Helen Keller



Aim for success, not perfection. Never give up your right to be wrong, because then you will lose the ability to learn new things and move forward with your life. Remember that fear always lurks behind perfectionism. Confronting your fears and allowing yourself the right to be human can, paradoxically, make yourself a happier and more productive person. - Dr. David M. Burns



Life is as dear to a mute creature as it is to man. Just as one wants happiness and fears pain, just as one wants to live and not die, so do other creatures. -His Holiness The Dalai Lama



Mankind's true moral test, its fundamental test (which lies deeply buried from view), consists of its attitude towards those who are at its mercy: animals. And in this respect mankind has suffered a fundamental debacle, a debacle so fundamental that all others stem from it. -



Milan Kundera, The Unbearable Lightness of Being



The worst sin towards our fellow creatures is not to hate them, but to be indifferent to them. That's the essence of inhumanity. -George Bernard Shaw

Ego's trick is to make us lose sight of our interdependence. That kind of ego-thought gives us a perfect justification to look out only for ourselves. But that is far from the truth. In reality we all depend on each other and we have to help each other. The husband has to help his wife, the wife has to help the husband, the mother has to help her children, and the children are supposed to help the parents too, whether they want to or not.-Gehlek Rinpoche Source: "The Best Buddhist Writing 2005 pg. 165

The hostile attitude of conquering nature ignores the basic interdependence of all things and events---that the world beyond the skin is actually an extension of our own bodies---and will end in destroying the very environment from which we emerge and upon which our whole life depends.