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Monday, September 29, 2008

My Brilliant Brain - Make Me A Genius

"At 38 years old, Susan Polgar has reached heights that few women have ever equalled in the chess world. Despite the common assumption that men’s brains are better at understanding spatial relationships, giving them an advantage in games such as chess, Susan went on to become the world’s first grandmaster. Susan’s remarkable abilities have earned her the label of ‘genius’, but her psychologist father, László Polgar, believed that genius was “not born, but made”. Noting that even Mozart received tutelage from his father at a very early age, Polgar set about teaching chess to the five-year-old Susan after she happened upon a chess set in their home. “My father believed that the potential of children was not used optimally,” says Susan"

A video concerning the Polgars,their upbringing and their father's belief that a genius is raised not born can be seen at http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-6378985927858479238&q=Susan+Polgar&total=29&start=0&num=10&so=0&type=search&plindex=2

The three Polgar sisters to play in a chess festival


According to the FIDE website, Judit Polgar, Susan Polgar and Sofia Polgar are going to participate in a chess festival on October 11,2008."The 2nd Aquaprofit-Polgár Chess day will be held in the Palace of Arts, in Budapest at 3 pm on the 11th of October 2008. Play will occur simultaneously against opponents on 45 boards (15 boards each) and new players will start after each game is finished. This way, according to the plans more than a hundred players will have the chance to play in the simultaneous games. The 2nd Aquaprofit-Polgár Chess day will be held in the Palace of Arts, in Budapest at 3 pm on the 11th of October 2008."

Source:http://www.fide.com/component/content/article/7-commissions/3330-press-release-2nd-aquaprofit-polgar-chess-day

FIDE October Rating's List Published

The October Ratings list of the FIDE has been published, and is available for viewing at the FIDE Website: http://www.fide.com . Regarding the Men, Veselin Topalov of Bulgaria regained first place with a rating of 2791 in the 1st October 2008 FIDE Rating List .Alexander Morozevich retained second spot with an elo of 2787 followed by Vassily Ivanchuk and Magnus Carlsen, both with ratings of 2786. Carlsen climbed from sixth to fourth position in the overall ratings.

Judit Polgar continued to lead the women's ranking with a rating of 2711 .Newly crowned Women's World Champion Alexandra Kosteniuk climbed from 39th to 8th place with 2525. Hou Yifan, who lost to Kosteniuk in the Women's finals, maintained first place among the Top Girls with 2578.

Here is a list of the top 10 rated chess players in the World:
Rank Name Title Country Rating Games B-Year
1 Topalov, Veselin g BUL 2791 10 1975
2 Morozevich, Alexander g RUS 2787 9 1977
3 Ivanchuk, Vassily g UKR 2786 50 1969
4 Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 2786 31 1990
5 Anand, Viswanathan g IND 2783 10 1969
6 Kramnik, Vladimir g RUS 2772 16 1975
7 Aronian, Levon g ARM 2757 23 1982
8 Radjabov, Teimour g AZE 2751 23 1987
9 Leko, Peter g HUN 2747 16 1979
10 Jakovenko, Dmitry g RUS 2737 39 1983

Here are the top-rated Women chess players in the world:

Rank Name Title Country Rating Games B-Year
1 Polgar, Judit g HUN 2711 0 1976
2 Koneru, Humpy g IND 2618 15 1987
3 Hou, Yifan wg CHN 2578 40 1994
4 Xie, Jun g CHN 2574 0 1970
5 Cramling, Pia g SWE 2550 23 1963
6 Stefanova,
Antoaneta g BUL 2548 15 1979
7 Sebag, Marie g FRA 2533 7 1986
8 Kosteniuk,
Alexandra g RUS 2525 21 1984
9 Zhao, Xue g CHN 2518 4 1985
10 Danielian, Elina m ARM 2513 27 1978
11 Kosintseva, Tatiana m RUS 2513 6 1986


Here are the top-rated Junior players in the World:
Rank Name Title Country Rating Games B-Year
1 Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 2786 31 1990
2 Karjakin, Sergey g UKR 2730 24 1990
3 Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime g FRA 2716 30 1990
4 Wang, Hao g CHN 2696 9 1989
5 Caruana, Fabiano g ITA 2640 10 1992
6 Mamedov, Rauf g AZE 2631 31 1988
7 Kuzubov, Yuriy g UKR 2622 33 1990
8 Li, Chao b g CHN 2622 33 1989
9 Nepomniachtchi, Ian g RUS 2616 18 1990
10 Zhou, Jianchao g CHN 2612 9 1988

And here are the 10 top-rated Junior Girl Chess players in the World:

Rank Name Title Country Rating Games B-Year
1 Hou, Yifan wg CHN 2578 40 1994
2 Muzychuk, Anna m SLO 2508 19 1990
3 Lahno, Kateryna g UKR 2488 24 1989
4 Harika,
Dronavalli m IND 2461 38 1991
5 Shen, Yang wg CHN 2450 8 1989
6 Muzychuk, Mariya wg UKR 2436 30 1992
7 Tairova, Elena m RUS 2422 11 1991
8 Ju, Wenjun CHN 2397 4 1991
9 Tan, Zhongyi CHN 2395 4 1991
10 Nadig, Kruttika wm IND 2387 62 1988

Source:http://ratings.fide.com/top.phtml?list=girls

Saturday, September 27, 2008

Deep Delta Chess Engine


A new chess engine is going to be designed by VersaGlobe International Limited. At the Blog of the Director of VersaGlobe I found this statement:

"David Coffin

September 23, 2008
With the World Computer Chess Championship starting in the end of September, we've started the undertaking of developing a chess playing engine. It will be a new kind of chess software considering advance tactical moves instead of the traditional raw computaion. We hope the artificial intelligence will be strong enough to be used in other difficult games such as poker and go, and possibly market simulations."
source:http://www.versaglobe.com/blog.htm

At the blog devoted to Deep Delta, the name of the new chess engine, I found this comment:

"VersaGlobe International Limited has enlisted the help of top chess players and programmers to create the world's strongest chess playing program, Deep Delta. Two advances that Deep Delta hopes to deliver to computer chess are very unique novelties (uncommon moves) in chess openings that are weighted to Delta's playing style, and dedicating processes and threads to advanced tactical sacrifices."

source:http://www.deltachess.info/


Watch out Rybka and Deep Hiarcs, Micha Tal has been reincarnated as a chess engine:)

Interview With New Women's World Champion, Alexandra Kosteniuk

An interview of Alexandra Kosteniuk, done by U.S. Chess Life magazine staff member Jerry Hanken has been posted at the United States Chess Federation website. To read the interview go to:http://main.uschess.org/content/blogsection/41/141/

Thursday, September 25, 2008

The world crown eludes Humpy – again

An interesting article concerning why GM Humpy Koneru of India did not win the recently finished Women's World Chess championship has been posted at the chessbase.com website.

To read this article go to: http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=4922

Fischer’s Grave Places Laugardaelir on the Map

"Since Robert James Fischer, grandmaster in chess, was buried at a local cemetery in Laugardaelir, earlier this year, there has been a steady increase in visitors to the gravesite. Laugardaelir is a hamlet of only 30 inhabitants, about one kilometer away from Selfoss in southwest Iceland." (source:http://www.icelandreview.com/icelandreview/search/news/Default.asp?ew_0_a_id=312549

GM Boris Spassky, Fischer's opponent in two matches, visited Fischer's grave in Iceland to commemorate Fischer’s 65th birthday and participate in the 23rd annual Reykjavík Chess Tournament, held in Fischer's memory.
source:http://www.icelandreview.com/icelandreview/search/news/Default.asp?ew_0_a_id=302584

Check mate! Chess thrives in Idaho grade schools

COUNCIL, Idaho: "The elementary school at the edge of this rural town has a playground that boasts little more than a swing set. That's no problem — the hot new game is inside.

Chess, once used as a way to teach war strategy, is now being taught to second- and third-graders across Idaho once a week as part of a plan to make students better at subjects like math and reading.

At first I thought, 'You've got to be kidding,'" said Penny Lattimer, a Council Elementary School teacher. "We already have so much stuff to teach."

Lattimer didn't know how to play chess until last year, when she and a dozen other Idaho teachers were trained as part of a pilot program to bring chess into public schools.

The state Department of Education has now invested $120,000 into the project, which was tested in 100 schools last year and expanded this fall to 100 more."
Source:http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/09/17/america/Chess-Schools.php
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In your humble blog owner's opinion, the initiative taken in Idaho is absolutely wonderful news. Chess can teach children so many things that are related to good performance in school and in later life, that is is wonderful that some teachers are pressing school adminstrations to include chess either in their curriculum or provide chess as an activity to play during lunch, and after school.

Chess compulsory for schools, say MPs

Politicians are campaigning for chess to be made compulsory at schools.

"Chess has educational and moral value and helps form character and personality," state the five MPs who initiated the campaign in Romania.

Source:Austrian Times newspaper

Tiny chess set built between heartbeats

The Times (London,England) has a fascinating story about the creation of the World's smallest chess board and set. The set could be the smallest board game in the world, it is no larger than a match head: board is 3.5 mm by 2.5 mm and the gold and silver pieces are 0.15 mm and 0.3 mm high. It was created by by Russian micro-miniaturist Vladimir Aniskin, and took him 6 months to finish.


The creativity of people in this world never ceases to amaze me! Here is a link to Aniskin's personal website: http://www.aniskin.ru/en/index.html

Source:http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/games_and_puzzles/chess/article3842965.ece

Tuesday, September 23, 2008

Jan Werle wins the European Union Championships

GM Jan Werle, the seventh highest-rated chess player in The Netherlands won the 2008 European Union Chess Championship. Werle (elo 2591) finished the event with a score of 8/10, which was a half-point better than three players:GM Laznicki of Cze, Adams of England and Short of England. Werle's performance rating for this tournament was 2713. He defeated Constantinou (2225), Kett (2247), Moser (2383),Edouard (2508),Bitalzadeh (2310),Fridman (2637),Laznicka (2601), lost to Langrock (2398), and drew with Michael Adams and Vachier-Lagrave.

5th China vs Russia Chess Match

At the present time, a chess match is being played in Ningpo, China. The match pits some of the strongest chess players in the World against each other. The players are from the country of China and the republic of "Russia". The match has been divided once again based upon gender of the participants. After four rounds of play in the match, The Russian women are ahead of the Chinese women by a score of 13.5-11.5 (Neither Hou Yifan of China or Alexandra Kosteniuk of Russia are playing in this event).
In the Men's match the Chinese men lead the Russian Men's team by a score of 14.5- 10.5 after 5 rounds of play.

The format of this match is as follows: From Sept 18 to 22 September, the team played five matches with the regular game time control of FIDE.September 23 - a day off. 24, 25 and 26 September, the teams will play in rapid chess and the final day, September 27, a blitz-match.
Sources:http://chesscenter.com/twic/twic.html http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.russiachess.org%2F&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&sl=ru&tl=en

Russian court convicts 13 of ethnic killings, including murder of chess champion

Sergei Nikolayev, was a 46-year-old professional chess player ( who had gained the International Master title) from Yakutia. Yakuts are a Siberian ethnic group that have largely East Asian physical features. Due to these features Nikolayev was one of those targeted and murdered by a group 13 teenage boys and a man in a series of vicious ethnic attacks.

"Russia has seen an alarming increase in hate crimes in recent years, with skinheads and nationalist groups targeting dark-skinned, non-Slavic-looking immigrants from the Caucasus and former Soviet Central Asia. Officials have been criticized for downplaying hate crimes and classifying many cases as incidents of hooliganism — a lesser crime." (source:http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/sns-ap-eu-russia-hate-crimes,0,3968277.story)

A very good eulogy of Nikolayev has been posted at http://www.chessvibes.com/personal/lang_nlrussische-schaker-omgebracht-door-jeugdbendelang_nllang_enrussian-chess-player-killed-by-ganglang_en/ by GM Alexander Baburin, the editor-in-chief of Chess Today.

Other articles concerning Nikolayev's murder and life can be read at:
http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=4200
http://english.pravda.ru/russia/history/23-09-2008/106430-skinheads-0

The FIDE takes a giant step backward

I was reading the Chessvibes.com blog and was amazed to learn that former FIDE President Campomanes has been appointed one of the members of the appeal committee at the upcoming 2008 World Chess Championship between Kramnik and Anand. How could the FIDE do this? When Campomanes cancelled the First WC Match between Karpov and Kasparov in 1985, the entire state of chess was thrown into a disorganized state for many years.This was due to the fact that a series of matches had to be held to resolve the matter, which caused other qualifying events to be adversely affected.

"On February 5, 2003, the Philippine anti-graft court Sandiganbayan convicted Florencio Campomanes, the former FIDE president, for failure to account for the Philippine Sports Commission (PSC) government funds amounting to PhP12.876 million (or US$238,746 at an exchange rate of PhP53.932=$1). The PSC entrusted these funds to the FIDE for the World Chess Olympiad in Manila, hosted by the Philippine government from June 6 to 25, 1992. Subsequently, Florencio Campomanes was sentenced to one year and 10 months imprisonment. According to a FIDE Press Releaseed 1/16/2007, Campomanes was cleared of these charges by the Philippine Supreme Court

dated in December, 2006, though FIDE's release states that the penalty was the equivalent of a 100 euro fine.

Campomanes' charges were overturned based upon a technicality. There was never any resolution about what happened to the 12.876 million pesos mentioned in the above paragraph. The rationale for the overturn was that the Supreme Court of the Philippines decided that Campomanes was not a government official to whom the anti-graft laws applied. Thus as a non-government official, Campomanes had no duty under the law he was prosecuted to render an accounting of the 12.876 million pesos." (source:Manila Times article by Jomar Canlas http://www.manilatimes.net/national/2006/dec/26/yehey/metro/20061226met1.html)"

Thursday, September 18, 2008

The Grandmaster Draw

In round 9 of the European Union Chess Championship, GM Michael Adams and GM Nigel Short agreed to a draw after only playing 12 moves. Adams will have no one to blame but himself if he fails to win this tournament, by a half-point due to his willingness to agree to a "Grandmaster-draw" with Short in round 9.

British expert P. H. Clarke talked about the positive aspects of a short draw:

"Unless you are of the calibre of Botvinnik – and who is – you cannot hope to play at full power day after day. The technical draws are a necessary means of conserving energy. As such, they contribute to raising the standard of play rather than lowering it .( Evans, Larry (1970), Chess Catechism, Simon and Schuster, ISBN 0-671-20491-2)

An interesting article concerning the phenomenon of the "Grandmaster draw" can read at http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=4513

2008 European Union Championships Liverpool

The 2008 European Union Championships are taking place in Liverpool,England from September 9th-18. After 9 rounds of play (in the ten round event), GM Jan Werle of the Netherlands leads with a score of 7.5 points. In second is GM Michael Adams of England, one-half point behind Werle. These two players played each other already in round 8 so they will not face each other again.In the last round of play, Werle has the White pieces against GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave of France (elo 2681 6.5 points) while Adams must play the black pieces against GM Emanuel Berg of Sweden (elo 2592 6.5 points). According to the chessbase online database (http://www.chesslive.de/), Werle and Vachier-Lagrave have played each other once in their chess careers, this game took place at the 2007 Wijk aan Zee tournament and Vachier-Lagrave won in 34 moves (the opening was an English). Berg always starts a game with white with the move 1.e4. Adams will allow an opponent playing White to use the Ruy Lopez opening against him or Adams will play the Caro-Kann Defense against 1.e4. (Note that Adams likes to play the exciting Marshall Gambit as Black against the Ruy Lopez: 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 O-O 8.c3 d5!?. However, Berg can play an anti-Marshall variation as White to prevent Adams from using the Marshall Gambit). Good luck to all players in the last round.

Source:http://www.liverpoolchessinternational.co.uk/crosstable.htm

Wednesday, September 17, 2008

Alexandra Kosteniuk:Women's World Chess Champion

GM Alexandria Kosteniuk and Hou Yifan drew the fourth game (what turned out to be the last game) of the 2008 Women's World Chess Championship. The draw result means that Kosteniuk is the new World Women's Chess Champion. The fourth game lasted 56 moves before the two players agreed to a draw. The final score in the match was 2.5-1.5. Congratulations to Alexandra Kosteniuk. Let us hope that her past efforts to promote chess in the World (especially to children), become even more pronounced during her reign, so that more people (especially children) learn to play chess in the world. The games in this Women's World Chess championship, were among the most hardly fought I have ever seen. In my opinion in most cases both players in a game in this Women's World Chess championship, continued playing trying to win, taking risks, much longer than any man would.

Here are the moves of the final game of the match between Kosteniuk and Yifan.The opening was a Sicilian Defense:Scheveningen variation


[Event "WCh-Women"]
[Site "Nalchik RUS"]
[Date "2008.09.17"]
[Round "6.4"]
[White "Kosteniuk,A"]
[Black "Hou Yifan"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2510"]
[BlackElo "2557"]
[EventDate "2008.09.14"]
[ECO:B85 ]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Be3 Nf6 7. Be2 Be7
8. O-O a6 9. a4 O-O 10. f4 Qc7 11. Kh1 Bd7 12. Nb3 b6 13. Qe1 Bc8 14. Qg3
Bb7 15. f5 Kh8 16. Rad1 Rae8 17. fxe6 fxe6 18. Qh3 Bd8 19. Nd4 Nxd4 20.
Rxd4 e5 21. Rc4 Qb8 22. Rd1 b5 23. axb5 axb5 24. Nxb5 Nxe4 25. Bd3 Nf6 26.
Rh4 e4 27. Be2 Bc8 28. Qg3 Ba6 29. c4 Bxb5 30. cxb5 Bb6 31. Bf4 Qa7 32.
Bxd6 Bf2 33. Qf4 Nd5 34. Qc1 Rc8 35. Qd2 Rfd8 36. Rxh7+ Kxh7 37. Qxd5 Qe3
38. Bg4 Ra8 39. Qe6 Kh8 40. Qe7 Qh6 41. h3 Qg6 42. Qe5 Bb6 43. Bh5 Qh6 44.
Bg4 e3 45. Qe4 Qf6 46. Rd5 Ra1+ 47. Kh2 Qxd6+ 48. Rxd6 Bc7 49. Qf5 Bxd6+
50. g3 Kg8 51. Qd5+ Kf8 52. Qf5+ Ke7 53. Qe6+ Kf8 54. Qf5+ Kg8 55. Qd5+ Kf8
56. Qf5+ 1/2-1/2

In case some of you are unaware, GM Alexandra Kosteniuk has had a very good website for a number of years, which can be visited at http://www.kosteniuk.com/. You can leave her your congratulations in her guestbook. I wish Alexandra all the best during her reign as Women's Chess Champion.

Saturday, September 13, 2008

New Feature of my Blog

Due to the wonderful efforts of Gregory at www.chessdiscussion.com, I am now able to upload chess games I have analyzed using my chess engines, to my blog using ChessViewer deluxe, so all of you followers of my blog can play through these games using I hope you enjoy this new feature. Simply use the arrows in the ChessViewer screen to play through the game I have uploaded. I hope you enjoy playing through these games as much as I enjoy bringing them to you. The analysis of the game between Alexandra Kosteniuk and Pia Cramling which is provided by me directly below this message, is my first use of ChessViewer deluxe on my blog. If you are going to use this analysis on a blog, website, or in a message online, all I ask is that you give me credit for my work.

Chessically yours,
Wayne

Analysis of Kosteniuk-Cramling game 1

Thursday, September 11, 2008

Kosteniuk advances to the final

GM Alexandra Kosteniuk of Russia held GM Pia Cramling to a draw in the second game of their semi-final match at the World Women's Chess Championship in Nalchik, Russia. This result means that Kosteniuk advances to the final against the winner of the Yifan Hou -Humpy Koneru match. In the second game of the Hou-Koneru match, with her back against the wall, facing a must win, Koneru came through and defeated Yifan Hou in 36 moves.

Here are the moves from the two games (in PGN format):

[Event "WCh-Women"]
[Site "Nalchik RUS"]
[Date "2008.09.10"]
[Round "5.2"]
[White "Cramling,P"]
[Black "Kosteniuk,A"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2544"]
[BlackElo "2510"]
[EventDate "2008.08.29"]
[ECO "D37"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. c4 d5 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. e3 a6 6. Bxc4 b5 7. Be2 Bb7 8.
O-O Nbd7 9. b3 c5 10. Bb2 Bd6 11. a4 b4 12. Nb1 O-O 13. Nbd2 Rc8 14. Rc1
Bb8 15. h3 Qe7 16. Nc4 cxd4 17. Nxd4 Nc5 18. f4 Ba7 19. Kh2 Be4 20. Ne5
Rfd8 21. Bf3 Qb7 22. Bxe4 Nfxe4 23. Qe2 Bb8 24. Nc4 f6 25. Rc2 e5 26. fxe5
fxe5 27. Nf5 Kh8 28. Kg1 Nc3 29. Qg4 Rf8 30. Rcf2 Nd3 31. Nfd6 Bxd6 32.
Nxd6 Nxf2 33. Rxf2 Qd5 34. Nxc8 Rxf2 35. Kxf2 Qd2+ 36. Kg3 Qe1+ 37. Kf3
Qe2+ 38. Kg3 Qe1+ 39. Kf3 Qe2+ 40. Kg3 1/2-1/2

[Event "WCh-Women"]
[Site "Nalchik RUS"]
[Date "2008.09.10"]
[Round "5.2"]
[White "Koneru,H"]
[Black "Hou Yifan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2622"]
[BlackElo "2557"]
[EventDate "2008.08.29"]
[ECO "A35"]

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 g6 6. Nc2 Bg7 7. e4 d6 8.
Be2 O-O 9. O-O Be6 10. b3 a6 11. Rb1 Rb8 12. Bb2 Qa5 13. b4 Qd8 14. f4 b5
15. cxb5 axb5 16. Kh1 Qd7 17. Qd2 Rfd8 18. Ne3 d5 19. exd5 Nxd5 20. Nexd5
Bxd5 21. Bxb5 Qb7 22. Nxd5 Qxb5 23. Bxg7 Rxd5 24. Qc3 Rd3 25. Qa1 f6 26. a4
Qd5 27. Bh6 Rxb4 28. Rxb4 Nxb4 29. f5 g5 30. Qc1 Nc6 31. a5 Rd2 32. Rg1
Nxa5 33. Qc8+ Qd8 34. Qe6+ Kh8 35. Qf7 Qg8 36. Qxe7 1-0

Analysis of Kosteniuk-Cramling game 1 html format

Here is the analysis I have done using html:

Kosteniuk,A (2510) - Cramling,P (2544) [C10]
WCh-Women Nalchik RUS (5.1), 10.09.2008
[Deep Rybka,Deep Hiarcs]

Opening:French Defense:ECO:E10 1.e4 e6 The French Defense. A surprise!. Cramling invariably has played the Sicilian Defense against 1.e4 in her career. 2.d4 d5 Creating a pawn lever, which is a key motif Black uses in this defense to create central tension. 3.Nc3 Nc6 A rarely played idea.Cramling attempts to take Kosteniuk out of well-known theoretical positions.She must have something prepared. [Analysis:More popular is: 3...Nf6 ] 4.Nf3 The main continuation for White in my database. 4...Nf6 Cramling creates a double-attack against the White e-pawn.Kosteniuk must decide if she wants to close the center by 5.e5 or not. [Analysis:In this position the move 4...Bb4 has also been tried.] 5.e5 She closes the center and wins a tempo.Now where will Cramling move her attacked knight to? [Analysis:According to my database these other moves have also been tried by White in this position. 5.Bd3 ; 5.exd5; 5.Bg5] 5...Ne4 The only move Black plays in this position in my database. 6.Bd3 [Analysis:According to my database, White has also tried the move 6.Ne2 in this position.] 6...Bb4 The only move Black plays in this position in my database. Cramling creates the threat of 7...Nxc3. [Deep Hiarcs: 6...Nxc3 7.bxc3 f5 (7...Be7 8.0-0 b6 9.Nd2 h5 10.Qf3 h4 11.h3 Bb7 12.Rd1 f5 13.exf6 gxf6) 8.exf6 Qxf6 9.Ng5 g6 10.0-0 Bd7 11.Nf3 h6+/=] 7.Bd2 [Analysis: According to my database, White has also used the move 7.0-0 in this position.] 7...Nxd2 The only move Black plays in this position in my database. Cramling gains the two bishops. [Deep Hiarcs: 7...Nxc3 8.Bxc3 Bxc3+ 9.bxc3 f5 10.c4 b6 11.c3 Na5 12.cxd5 Qxd5 13.c4!? Qd7 14.0-0 0-0=] 8.Qxd2 [Deep Hiarcs: >=8.Nxd2 f5 9.a3 Bxc3 10.bxc3 0-0 11.0-0 Bd7 12.Nf3 Na5 13.Qd2 c5!? 14.Rfb1 b6 15.Qf4 Qe7=] 8...f6+/= The move Deep Hiarcs also suggested (and the only move I found Black had played in this position in my database). 9.a3 Kosteniuk forces Cramling to make a decision about her bishop.Cramling can spend a tempo to retain the two bishops (by moving it) or capture on c3. 9...Bxc3 [Analysis:(a)Deep Hiarcs: 9...Be7 10.exf6 Bxf6 11.0-0-0 0-0 12.Kb1 Nxd4 13.Nxd4 Bxd4 14.Bxh7+!? Kxh7 15.Qxd4 Qf6 16.Qd3+ Qf5 17.Qg3 Qf4+/=; (b):In this position, Deep Rybka preferred to play the move 9...Ba5 with a possible continuation being: 10.Bb5 0-0 11.exf6 Qxf6 12.0-0 Qf4 13.Bxc6 bxc6 14.Qd3 Bb6 15.Rfe1 Bd7+/=] 10.Qxc3 fxe5 Also suggested by Deep Hiarcs. 11.dxe5 Qe7N This move is a theoretical novelty for the position. (Deep Rybka also suggested this move as being the "best". [Deep Hiarcs: >=11...Bd7 12.h4 Qe7 13.0-0-0 0-0-0 14.Kb1 Kb8 15.h5 Rdf8 16.Qd2 Qc5 17.Qg5 Rfg8 18.Qg3 h6=; Analysis:In the following game Black played 12....O-O: 11...0-0 [Event "Andorra op 25th"] [Site "Andorra"] [Date "2007.06.30"] [Round "1"] [White "Timoshenko, Georgy"] [Black "Sola Plaza, Gregorio"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C10"] [WhiteElo "2566"] [BlackElo "2048"] [PlyCount "101"] [EventDate "2007.06.30"] [EventType "swiss"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "AND"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceDate "2007.09.04"] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. e5 Ne4 6. Bd3 Bb4 7. Bd2 Nxd2 8.Qxd2 f6 9. a3 Bxc3 10. Qxc3 fxe5 11. dxe5 Qe7 12. O-O O-O 13. Rae1 Bd7 14. Qd2 h6 15. Qe3 Qf7 16. c3 Qf4 17. Qe2 Ne7 18. Nd2 Qh4 19. g3 Qh3 20. f4 Be8 21. c4 Bh5 22. Qe3 c6 23. c5 Bg4 24. Rf2 Qh5 25. Bf1 Bh3 26. Qf3 Qxf3 27. Nxf3 Bxf1 28. Kxf1 Rae8 29. Kg2 g6 30. h3 Kg7 31. Re3 Rf7 32. Rb3 Ng8 33. Nd4 Kh7 34. g4 Kh8 35. Kg3 Kh7 36. Rff3 Kh8 37. Rb4 Ree7 38. Ra4 a6 39. Rb4 Kh7 40. Rb6 Kh8 41. Rfb3 Kh7 42. R3b4 Kh8 43. Nb3 g5 44. Na5 gxf4+ 45. Kf3 Rd7 46. Rxb7 d4 47. Rxd7 Rxd7 48. Nxc6 d3 49. Rd4 Kg7 50. b4 h5 51. Nd8 1-0 ] 12.h4 Kosteniuk spends a tempo to reduce the mobility of Cramlings' queen. [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs:(a) >=12.Qd2 /\0-0 13.Qe3 Bd7 14.0-0 Nd8 15.Ng5 g6 16.Qg3 c5 17.c3 a6 18.Rfe1 Qg7 19.b3 Nf7 20.f3 b5+/=; (b) >=12.0-0 Bd7 13.Qd2 0-0-0 14.b4 a6 15.c4 dxc4 16.Bxc4 Be8 17.Qc3 Rf8 18.Rfd1 Rxd1+ 19.Rxd1 Bh5 20.Be2 Rd8 21.Rxd8+ Qxd8=; (c)Analysis:Deep Rybka: 12.0-0-0 Bd7 13.h4 0-0-0 14.h5 Kb8 15.Kb1 h6 16.Be2 Rhf8 17.Qe3 Na5=] 12...Bd7 Intending to castle on the queenside. [Analysis:Deep Rybka: 12...Bd7 13.0-0-0 0-0-0 14.Kb1 Kb8 15.Qd2 h6 16.h5 Rhf8 17.Rh3 Be8 18.Rdh1] 13.b4 Kosteniuk aggressively launches a pawn up the board.She suggests to Cramling, that if Cramling decides to castle on the queenside,that Cramling's King will be placed under immediate pressure by Kosteniuk's pawns. The drawback of this move is that if Kosteniuk decides to castle on the queenside, her pawn structure in front of her king will have been weakened due to this move. [Analysis:(a)Deep Hiarcs: >=13.h5 /\0-0-0 14.0-0-0 Kb8 15.Be2 Rdf8 16.Kb1 Rf4 17.Qd2 Rg4 18.Rh2 Rf8<=>; (b)Deep Rybka: 13.0-0-0 0-0-0 14.Kb1 h6 15.Be2 Rhf8 16.Qe3 Kb8 17.h5 Na5 18.b4 Nc6=] 13...a6 Cramling indicates to Kosteniuk,that if Kosteniuk continues to advance her pawn to b5,Cramling will capture the pawn and gain a half-open a-file for her rooks. [Analysis:Deep Rybka: 13...a6 14.h5 0-0 15.Rh3 h6 16.Kf1 Rf4 17.Rd1 Raf8 18.Kg1 Be8 19.Kh1 Rg4 20.Qd2 Bf7 21.Rc1 Qd8 =] 14.h5 Gaining space on the kingside and threatening to create a pawn lever via 15.h6. [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs: >=14.Qd2 0-0-0 15.Qe3 Kb8 16.0-0 Rhf8 17.Rad1 d4!? 18.Qe4 Be8 19.Qg4 h6 20.Rfe1 Qf7 21.b5 axb5 22.Bxb5 Rd5 23.Bc4 h5 24.Qh3 Ra5 25.Bxe6 Qf4 26.Bb3 Nxe5 27.Rxd4 Qf6+/=; Analysis:Deep Rybka: 14.h5 0-0 15.h6 g6 16.Rh3 Rf4 17.Kf1 Qf8 18.Qb2 Qf7 19.Rc1 b5 20.Re1 Rg4+/=] 14...0-0-0 [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs and Deep Rybka:Both chess programs preferred to castle on the kingside: >=14...0-0 15.0-0-0 (Analysis:Deep Rybka: 15.h6 g6 16.Rh3 Rf4 17.Kf1 Rg4 18.Qb2 Rf8 19.Qc3 Qf7 20.Re1 Qf4 21.Qc5 Rf7=) 15...Rf4 16.Kb2 Raf8 17.Rde1 Be8 18.Qd2 Rg4 19.Reg1 a5 20.c3 d4=/+] 15.Qd2 Fighting for control of the diagonal. [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs: 15.0-0-0 Rdf8 16.Qe1 Rf4 17.Qe3 Rg4 18.g3 Kb8 19.Rh3 Be8 20.h6!? gxh6 21.Rxh6 a5!? 22.c3 Bg6 23.Bxg6 Rxg6 24.Rdh1 Rg4 25.R1h4 Rxh4 26.Rxh4 Rf8+/=; Analysis:Deep Rybka: 15.Qc5 Rdf8 16.Qxe7 Nxe7 17.Ke2 Rf4 18.Rh4 Rxh4 19.Nxh4 Rf8 20.Bxh7 Rh8 21.Bd3 Rxh5 22.Nf3 Ba4=] 15...Kb8 Cramling spends a tempo to place her king in a more secure location, in that Kosteniuk could advance her c-pawn to c4 and create a pawn lever which after cxd5 would give her a half-open c-file to use to attack Cramling's king. [Analysis: Deep Rybka: 15...Kb8 16.Qf4 Rdf8 17.Qh4 g5!? 18.hxg6 Qxh4 19.Rxh4 hxg6 20.Rxh8 Rxh8 21.Ke2 Ka7=] 16.c3 Kosteniuk prevents Cramling from advancing her d-pawn to d4. [Analysis:(a)Deep Hiarcs: >=16.Qe3 h6 17.Kf1!? (Worse is 17.0-0 /\Be8 18.b5 axb5 19.Bxb5 Na7 20.Bxe8 Qxe8 21.a4 Nc6=) 17...Rhf8 18.Kg1; (b)Deep Rybka: >=16.Qf4 Rdf8 17.Qh4 Qf7 18.0-0-0 Ne7 19.Kb2 Nf5 20.Bxf5 Qxf5 21.Rd2 Rf7 22.Qg3 Qf4 23.Qxf4 Rxf4 24.h6!? g6=] 16...Rdf8 Also the move Deep Hiarcs was going to play.Cramling places her rook on the half-open file.This gives her the option of sacrificing her rook on c3 which would weaken the pawn structure in front of Kosteniuk's king. [Analysis:Deep Rybka: 16...Rhf8 17.Qe3 Be8 18.h6 gxh6 19.Rxh6 Qg7 20.Qg5 Qxg5 21.Nxg5 Nxe5 22.Bxh7 Rd6=] 17.Qe3 Kosteniuk places her queen on a key diagonal which leads deep into Cramling's position. This idea also results in the overprotection of Kosteniuk's weak e-pawn and was also suggested by Deep Hiarcs and Deep Rybka. [Rybka 2.3 mp 32-bit new: 17.Qe3 g5 18.hxg6 (18.Qxg5 Qf7 19.Rh2 Ne7 20.Qe3 Rhg8=) 18...hxg6 19.0-0-0 Qe8 20.Ng5 Qe7 21.Kb2 Qg7+/=] 17...Na7 The move Deep Hiarcs was going to play in this position.Cramling gains more influence over the b5-square and also prepares the advance of her c-pawn. [Analysis:(a)Deep Rybka: >=17...g6 18.a4 d4!? 19.Nxd4 Nxd4 20.Qxd4 Bc6 21.b5 Bxg2 22.Rg1 Bd5 23.bxa6 c5 24.Qe3 Rf3 25.Qd2 Rhf8<=>; (b)Analysis:Deep Hiarcs: 17...Qf7 18.a4 Qf4 19.Ke2 Qxe3+ 20.Kxe3 Ne7 (20...d4+!? 21.Nxd4 Nxe5 22.Be2 Rf6+/=) 21.b5 Ka7 22.bxa6 bxa6 23.a5 Rb8+/=; (c)Analysis:Deep Rybka: 17...Ka8 18.a4 Rxf3!? 19.Qxf3 Nxe5 20.Qg3 Nxd3+ 21.Qxd3 Be8 22.b5 a5 23.Kf1 Rf8+/=] 18.a4 Creating more pressure against b5. [Analysis:Deep Rybka: 18.a4 g6 (‹18...Qe8 19.h6 g6 20.b5!? axb5 21.axb5 Nxb5 22.0-0 b6© With compensation for the pawn.) ] 18...c5!? Risky! Rather than simply trying to strengthen her defensive position, Cramling weakens the pawn structure in front of her king, and threatens ....c4.The move ....c5 is often played by Black in the French defense to gain counterplay, however this is usually after Black has castled on the kingside. [Analysis:Deep Rybka and Deep Hiarcs: >=18...Nc8 19.b5 a5 20.0-0 (20.Kf1 Nb6 21.Rh3 g6 22.Kg1 gxh5 23.Rxh5 Be8 24.Rh6 Bg6 25.Nd4 Rhg8=) 20...Nb6 21.Ra2 h6 22.Be2 Rhg8 23.Rc1 g5 24.hxg6 Rxg6 25.g3 h5<=>; >=18...h6 19.0-0 Nc8 20.b5 a5 21.Be2 Nb6 22.Nd4 Rhg8 23.Qg3 Qg5 24.Qxg5 hxg5=; Deep Hiarcs and Deep Rybka:: >=18...Be8 19.Qg5 (Deep Hiarcs: 19.b5 ) 19...Qxg5 20.Nxg5 Nc6 21.Nf3 g6 22.hxg6 Bxg6 23.Bxg6 hxg6 24.Ke2 b5 25.axb5 axb5=] 19.bxc5+/= [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs and Deep Rybka: >=19.Qxc5 Qxc5 20.bxc5 Rf4 21.Kd2 Nc6 (21...Rg4 22.Rhb1 (22.g3 Rf8 23.Ke3 Rc8 24.Nd4 Rxc5 25.Kf3 Rxc3!? 26.Kxg4 Rxd3 27.Rad1 Rc3) 22...a5 23.g3 Rf8 24.Ke3 Rc8+/=) 22.Ke3 Rhf8 23.Rh3 Rg4+/-] 19...Rc8 Threatening to regain her pawn via either ...Rxc5 or ...Qxc5. [Analysis:Deep Rybka: 19...Rc8 20.Rb1 Ka8 21.Rh4 Nc6 22.Rb6 Rhf8 23.Rh3 h6 24.Kf1 Na5 25.Rg3 Rg8+/=] 20.Rb1 Kosteniuk creates the threat of 21.Bxa6 winning a pawn. 20...Qxc5?! Offering to exchange queens.which would simply the position, however, this idea allows Kosteniuk to win Cramling's a-pawn. [Analysis:Deep Rybka and Deep Hiarcs: >=20...Ka8 21.c4 (Deep Hiarcs: 21.Rh4 Qxc5 22.Qxc5 Rxc5 23.Rg4 g6 24.hxg6 hxg6 25.Kd2 Rcc8) 21...Rxc5 (21...Qxc5 22.cxd5 Qxe3+ 23.fxe3 exd5 24.Rh4 Nc6 25.Rf4 Rhe8+/=) 22.cxd5 exd5 23.Nd4 Nc6 24.Nxc6 Bxc6 25.Qd4 Rc8+/=] 21.Qxc5 Rxc5 22.Bxa6+/= Rc7?! [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs and Deep Rybka:Better is >=22...Bc8 23.Kd2 Ra5 24.Bd3 (24.Bb5 Nxb5 25.axb5 Ra2+ (‹25...Bd7 26.h6 g6 27.Ng5 Ra4 (27...Bxb5 28.Ra1 Rxa1 29.Rxa1 Bd7+/- (29...Rf8+-) ) ) ) 24...Rxa4 25.Rb4 Rxb4 26.cxb4 h6+/=] 23.Kd2+/- Deep Rybka evaluates that Kosteniuk has a definite advantage in this position (+/-). 23...Bxa4 Regaining material equality. [Analysis: 23...Nc6 24.Bd3 h6 25.Rh4 Rf8 26.Rb3 Ka7+/-] 24.Rb4 Winning a tempo. [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs: >=24.Nd4 Bd7 25.Bd3 Nc6 26.Nb5 Nxe5!? 27.Nxc7 Kxc7 28.Be2 Rf8 29.f3 Bc6; Analysis:Deep Rybka: >=24.Rh4 Bc6 25.Bd3 Re7 26.Ra1 Bd7 27.Rf4 Be8 28.g4 Nc6+/=] 24...Bd7 The lost tempo. 25.Rhb1 Creating the threat of 26.Rxb7 which would be decisive. 25...Bc8?! [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs and Deep Rybka: >=25...b5 26.Rf4 Be8 27.Nd4 Re7 28.g4 (28.Ke3 Rc7 29.Rb3 h6 30.g4 Ka8 31.Kd2 (31.Nxe6? Rc6 32.Nxg7 Rxa6 33.Nxe8 Rxe8) 31...Re7) 28...Kc7 29.Nxb5+ Bxb5 30.Bxb5 Rb8 31.Rfb4 Nxb5 32.Rxb5 Rxb5 33.Rxb5 Rf7+/- And Cramling would have insufficient compensation for the pawn.] 26.Nd4 Threatening Nxe6 26...Re8 27.f4 [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs: 27.Rb6 g6 28.hxg6 hxg6 29.f4 Rg7 30.c4 g5 31.g3 gxf4 32.gxf4 dxc4 33.Bxc4 Rd7+-] 27...Ree7 28.Rb6 h6 29.g3 Re8 30.Rd6 [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs: 30.R1b4 Ka8 31.Be2 Rc5 32.c4 Nc6 33.Nxc6 Rxc6 34.cxd5 exd5 35.R6b5 Kb8] 30...Ree7 [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs: >=30...Ka8 31.Bd3 Ree7 32.f5 exf5 33.e6 Re8 34.Re1 Nc6 35.Nxf5 Kb8] 31.Bf1 [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs: >=31.Be2 Bd7 32.Bg4 Rc4 33.Rdb6 Bc8 34.R1b2 Ka8 35.Bh3 Kb8] 31...Bd7 [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs: 31...Re8 32.Bh3 Rce7 33.Kd3 Bd7 34.Rdb6 Bc8 35.c4 dxc4+ 36.Kxc4 Rd8 37.Rd6 Rxd6 38.exd6 Re8] 32.Bh3 Creating a triple-attack against Cramling's e-pawn. 32...Nc8? This move is a mistake because it allows Kosteniuk to play 33.Bxe6. [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs and Deep Rybka:Better is >=32...Rc4 33.f5 (33.Rdb6 Bc8 34.R1b2 Ka8 35.Rd6 Bd7 36.Nxe6 Nc8 37.Rxd7!? Rxd7 38.Bf1 Ne7 39.Nxg7 Ng8 40.Ne6 Rc8+-) 33...exf5 34.e6 Bc6 35.Nxf5 Kc7 36.Nxe7 Kxd6 37.Nf5+ Kc7] 33.Bxe6!? Allowing an exchange sacrifice. 33...Nxd6 [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs: >=33...Bxe6 34.Rxe6 Rxe6 35.Nxe6 Rd7 36.Kd3 Re7 37.Nd4 Rf7 38.Nc6+ Kc7 39.Rxb7+! Kxb7 40.Nd8+ Kc7 41.Nxf7+-] 34.exd6 Regaining a rook. 34...Bxe6?? A blunder. [Analysis:Deep Hiarcs: >=34...Rxe6 35.dxc7+ Kxc7 36.Nxe6+ Bxe6 37.Ra1 Bg4 38.Ra8 Bxh5 39.Rh8 Bf3+-] 35.dxe7 Bd7 [35...Bf7 36.Nf5 Bxh5 37.Nxg7 Bg6 38.Re1 Bf7 39.f5 Ka7+-; 35...Rxe7?? 36.Nc6+ Kc7 37.Nxe7+-] 36.Nf5 Threatening 37.Re1 or 37.Nxg7 so Cramling resigned. 1-0

Analysis of Kosteniuk-Cramling game 1 PGN format

Here is some analysis I have done of the first game of the match between Alexandra Kosteniuk and Pia Cramling. The format of this analysis is PGN , so if you have a program that can read PGN files on your computer,simply copy and paste this analysis into the program and enjoy the game :)

[Event "WCh-Women"]
[Site "Nalchik RUS"]
[Date "2008.09.10"]
[Round "5.1"]
[White "Kosteniuk, A."]
[Black "Cramling, P."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C10"]
[WhiteElo "2510"]
[BlackElo "2544"]
[Annotator "Deep Rybka,Deep Hiarcs"]
[PlyCount "71"]
[EventDate "2008.08.29"]

{Opening:French Defense:ECO:E10} 1. e4 e6 {The French Defense. A surprise!.
Cramling invariably has played the Sicilian Defense against 1.e4 in her career.
} 2. d4 d5 {Creating a pawn lever, which is a key motif Black uses in this
defense to create central tension.} 3. Nc3 Nc6 {A rarely played idea.Cramling
attempts to take Kosteniuk out of well-known theoretical positions.She must
have something prepared.} ({Analysis:More popular is:} 3... Nf6) 4. Nf3 {
The main continuation for White in my database.} Nf6 {Cramling creates a
double-attack against the White e-pawn.Kosteniuk must decide if she wants to
close the center by 5.e5 or not.} ({Analysis:In this position the move} 4...
Bb4 {has also been tried.}) 5. e5 {She closes the center and wins a tempo.Now
where will Cramling move her attacked knight to?} ({Analysis:According to my
database these other moves have also been tried by White in this position.} 5.
Bd3) (5. exd5) (5. Bg5) 5... Ne4 {
The only move Black plays in this position in my database.} 6. Bd3 ({
Analysis:According to my database, White has also tried the move} 6. Ne2 {
in this position.}) 6... Bb4 {The only move Black plays in this position in my
database. Cramling creates the threat of 7...Nxc3.} ({Deep Hiarcs:} 6... Nxc3
7. bxc3 f5 (7... Be7 8. O-O b6 9. Nd2 h5 10. Qf3 h4 11. h3 Bb7 12. Rd1 f5 13.
exf6 gxf6) 8. exf6 Qxf6 9. Ng5 g6 10. O-O Bd7 11. Nf3 h6 $14) 7. Bd2 ({
Analysis: According to my database, White has also used the move} 7. O-O {
in this position.}) 7... Nxd2 {The only move Black plays in this position in
my database. Cramling gains the two bishops.} ({Deep Hiarcs:} 7... Nxc3 8. Bxc3
Bxc3+ 9. bxc3 f5 10. c4 b6 11. c3 Na5 12. cxd5 Qxd5 13. c4 $5 Qd7 14. O-O O-O
$11) 8. Qxd2 ({Deep Hiarcs:} 8. Nxd2 $142 f5 9. a3 Bxc3 10. bxc3 O-O 11. O-O
Bd7 12. Nf3 Na5 13. Qd2 c5 $5 14. Rfb1 b6 15. Qf4 Qe7 $11) 8... f6 $14 {
The move Deep Hiarcs also suggested (and the only move I found Black had
played in this position in my database).} 9. a3 {Kosteniuk forces Cramling to
make a decision about her bishop.Cramling can spend a tempo to retain the two
bishops (by moving it) or capture on c3.} Bxc3 ({Analysis:(a)Deep Hiarcs:} 9...
Be7 10. exf6 Bxf6 11. O-O-O O-O 12. Kb1 Nxd4 13. Nxd4 Bxd4 14. Bxh7+ $5 Kxh7
15. Qxd4 Qf6 16. Qd3+ Qf5 17. Qg3 Qf4 $14) ({
(b):In this position, Deep Rybka preferred to play the move} 9... Ba5 {
with a possible continuation being:} 10. Bb5 O-O 11. exf6 Qxf6 12. O-O Qf4 13.
Bxc6 bxc6 14. Qd3 Bb6 15. Rfe1 Bd7 $14) 10. Qxc3 fxe5 {
Also suggested by Deep Hiarcs.} 11. dxe5 Qe7 $146 {This move is a theoretical
novelty for the position. (Deep Rybka also suggested this move as being the
"best".} ({Deep Hiarcs:} 11... Bd7 $142 12. h4 Qe7 13. O-O-O O-O-O 14. Kb1 Kb8
15. h5 Rdf8 16. Qd2 Qc5 17. Qg5 Rfg8 18. Qg3 h6 $11) ({
Analysis:In the following game Black played 12....O-O:} 11... O-O {[Event "And
orra op 25th"] [Site "Andorra"] [Date "2007.06.30"] [Round "1"] [White
"Timoshenko, Georgy"] [Black "Sola Plaza, Gregorio"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO
"C10"] [WhiteElo "2566"] [BlackElo "2048"] [PlyCount "101"] [EventDate
"2007.06.30"] [EventType "swiss"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "AND"]
[Source "ChessBase"] [SourceDate "2007.09.04"] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3
Nc6 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. e5 Ne4 6. Bd3 Bb4 7. Bd2 Nxd2 8.Qxd2 f6 9. a3 Bxc3 10. Qxc3
fxe5 11. dxe5 Qe7 12. O-O O-O 13. Rae1 Bd7 14. Qd2 h6 15. Qe3 Qf7 16. c3 Qf4
17. Qe2 Ne7 18. Nd2 Qh4 19. g3 Qh3 20. f4 Be8 21. c4 Bh5 22. Qe3 c6 23. c5 Bg4
24. Rf2 Qh5 25. Bf1 Bh3 26. Qf3 Qxf3 27. Nxf3 Bxf1 28. Kxf1 Rae8 29. Kg2 g6
30. h3 Kg7 31. Re3 Rf7 32. Rb3 Ng8 33. Nd4 Kh7 34. g4 Kh8 35. Kg3 Kh7 36.
Rff3 Kh8 37. Rb4 Ree7 38. Ra4 a6 39. Rb4 Kh7 40. Rb6 Kh8 41. Rfb3 Kh7 42. R3b4
Kh8 43. Nb3 g5 44. Na5 gxf4+ 45. Kf3 Rd7 46. Rxb7 d4 47. Rxd7 Rxd7 48. Nxc6
d3 49. Rd4 Kg7 50. b4 h5 51. Nd8 1-0}) 12. h4 {
Kosteniuk spends a tempo to reduce the mobility of Cramlings' queen.} ({
Analysis:Deep Hiarcs:(a)} 12. Qd2 $142 O-O $140 13. Qe3 Bd7 14. O-O Nd8 15. Ng5
g6 16. Qg3 c5 17. c3 a6 18. Rfe1 Qg7 19. b3 Nf7 20. f3 b5 $14) ({(b)} 12. O-O
$142 Bd7 13. Qd2 O-O-O 14. b4 a6 15. c4 dxc4 16. Bxc4 Be8 17. Qc3 Rf8 18. Rfd1
Rxd1+ 19. Rxd1 Bh5 20. Be2 Rd8 21. Rxd8+ Qxd8 $11) ({(c)Analysis:Deep Rybka:}
12. O-O-O Bd7 13. h4 O-O-O 14. h5 Kb8 15. Kb1 h6 16. Be2 Rhf8 17. Qe3 Na5 $11)
12... Bd7 {Intending to castle on the queenside.} ({Analysis:Deep Rybka:} 12...
Bd7 13. O-O-O O-O-O 14. Kb1 Kb8 15. Qd2 h6 16. h5 Rhf8 17. Rh3 Be8 18. Rdh1)
13. b4 {Kosteniuk aggressively launches a pawn up the board.She suggests to
Cramling, that if Cramling decides to castle on the queenside,that Cramling's
King will be placed under immediate pressure by Kosteniuk's pawns. The
drawback of this move is that if Kosteniuk decides to castle on the queenside,
her pawn structure in front of her king will have been weakened due to this
move.} ({Analysis:(a)Deep Hiarcs:} 13. h5 $142 O-O-O $140 14. O-O-O Kb8 15. Be2
Rdf8 16. Kb1 Rf4 17. Qd2 Rg4 18. Rh2 Rf8 $132) ({(b)Deep Rybka:} 13. O-O-O
O-O-O 14. Kb1 h6 15. Be2 Rhf8 16. Qe3 Kb8 17. h5 Na5 18. b4 Nc6 $11) 13... a6 {
Cramling indicates to Kosteniuk,that if Kosteniuk continues to advance her
pawn to b5,Cramling will capture the pawn and gain a half-open a-file for her
rooks.} ({Analysis:Deep Rybka:} 13... a6 14. h5 O-O 15. Rh3 h6 16. Kf1 Rf4 17.
Rd1 Raf8 18. Kg1 Be8 19. Kh1 Rg4 20. Qd2 Bf7 21. Rc1 Qd8 {=}) 14. h5 {
Gaining space on the kingside and threatening to create a pawn lever via 15.h6.
} ({Analysis:Deep Hiarcs:} 14. Qd2 $142 O-O-O 15. Qe3 Kb8 16. O-O Rhf8 17. Rad1
d4 $5 18. Qe4 Be8 19. Qg4 h6 20. Rfe1 Qf7 21. b5 axb5 22. Bxb5 Rd5 23. Bc4 h5
24. Qh3 Ra5 25. Bxe6 Qf4 26. Bb3 Nxe5 27. Rxd4 Qf6 $14) ({Analysis:Deep Rybka:
} 14. h5 O-O 15. h6 g6 16. Rh3 Rf4 17. Kf1 Qf8 18. Qb2 Qf7 19. Rc1 b5 20. Re1
Rg4 $14) 14... O-O-O ({Analysis:Deep Hiarcs and Deep Rybka:Both chess programs
preferred to castle on the kingside:} 14... O-O $142 15. O-O-O ({
Analysis:Deep Rybka:} 15. h6 g6 16. Rh3 Rf4 17. Kf1 Rg4 18. Qb2 Rf8 19. Qc3 Qf7
20. Re1 Qf4 21. Qc5 Rf7 $11) 15... Rf4 16. Kb2 Raf8 17. Rde1 Be8 18. Qd2 Rg4
19. Reg1 a5 20. c3 d4 $15) 15. Qd2 {Fighting for control of the diagonal.} ({
Analysis:Deep Hiarcs:} 15. O-O-O Rdf8 16. Qe1 Rf4 17. Qe3 Rg4 18. g3 Kb8 19.
Rh3 Be8 20. h6 $5 gxh6 21. Rxh6 a5 $5 22. c3 Bg6 23. Bxg6 Rxg6 24. Rdh1 Rg4 25.
R1h4 Rxh4 26. Rxh4 Rf8 $14) ({Analysis:Deep Rybka:} 15. Qc5 Rdf8 16. Qxe7 Nxe7
17. Ke2 Rf4 18. Rh4 Rxh4 19. Nxh4 Rf8 20. Bxh7 Rh8 21. Bd3 Rxh5 22. Nf3 Ba4 $11
) 15... Kb8 {Cramling spends a tempo to place her king in a more secure
location, in that Kosteniuk could advance her c-pawn to c4 and create a pawn
lever which after cxd5 would give her a half-open c-file to use to attack
Cramling's king.} ({Analysis: Deep Rybka:} 15... Kb8 16. Qf4 Rdf8 17. Qh4 g5 $5
18. hxg6 Qxh4 19. Rxh4 hxg6 20. Rxh8 Rxh8 21. Ke2 Ka7 $11) 16. c3 {
Kosteniuk prevents Cramling from advancing her d-pawn to d4.} ({
Analysis:(a)Deep Hiarcs:} 16. Qe3 $142 h6 17. Kf1 $5 ({Worse is} 17. O-O Be8
$140 18. b5 axb5 19. Bxb5 Na7 20. Bxe8 Qxe8 21. a4 Nc6 $11) 17... Rhf8 18. Kg1)
({(b)Deep Rybka:} 16. Qf4 $142 Rdf8 17. Qh4 Qf7 18. O-O-O Ne7 19. Kb2 Nf5 20.
Bxf5 Qxf5 21. Rd2 Rf7 22. Qg3 Qf4 23. Qxf4 Rxf4 24. h6 $5 g6 $11) 16... Rdf8 {
Also the move Deep Hiarcs was going to play.Cramling places her rook on the
half-open file.This gives her the option of sacrificing her rook on c3 which
would weaken the pawn structure in front of Kosteniuk's king.} ({
Analysis:Deep Rybka:} 16... Rhf8 17. Qe3 Be8 18. h6 gxh6 19. Rxh6 Qg7 20. Qg5
Qxg5 21. Nxg5 Nxe5 22. Bxh7 Rd6 $11) 17. Qe3 {Kosteniuk places her queen on a
key diagonal which leads deep into Cramling's position. This idea also
results in the overprotection of Kosteniuk's weak e-pawn and was also
suggested by Deep Hiarcs and Deep Rybka.} ({Rybka 2.3 mp 32-bit new:} 17. Qe3
g5 18. hxg6 (18. Qxg5 Qf7 19. Rh2 Ne7 20. Qe3 Rhg8 $11) 18... hxg6 19. O-O-O
Qe8 20. Ng5 Qe7 21. Kb2 Qg7 $14) 17... Na7 {The move Deep Hiarcs was going to
play in this position.Cramling gains more influence over the b5-square and
also prepares the advance of her c-pawn.} ({Analysis:(a)Deep Rybka:} 17... g6
$142 18. a4 d4 $5 19. Nxd4 Nxd4 20. Qxd4 Bc6 21. b5 Bxg2 22. Rg1 Bd5 23. bxa6
c5 24. Qe3 Rf3 25. Qd2 Rhf8 $132) ({(b)Analysis:Deep Hiarcs:} 17... Qf7 18. a4
Qf4 19. Ke2 Qxe3+ 20. Kxe3 Ne7 (20... d4+ $5 21. Nxd4 Nxe5 22. Be2 Rf6 $14) 21.
b5 Ka7 22. bxa6 bxa6 23. a5 Rb8 $14) ({(c)Analysis:Deep Rybka:} 17... Ka8 18.
a4 Rxf3 $5 19. Qxf3 Nxe5 20. Qg3 Nxd3+ 21. Qxd3 Be8 22. b5 a5 23. Kf1 Rf8 $14)
18. a4 {Creating more pressure against b5.} ({Analysis:Deep Rybka:} 18. a4 g6 (
18... Qe8 $143 19. h6 g6 20. b5 $5 axb5 21. axb5 Nxb5 22. O-O b6 $44 {
With compensation for the pawn.})) 18... c5 $5 {Risky! Rather than simply
trying to strengthen her defensive position, Cramling weakens the pawn
structure in front of her king, and threatens ....c4.The move ....c5 is often
played by Black in the French defense to gain counterplay, however this is
usually after Black has castled on the kingside.} ({
Analysis:Deep Rybka and Deep Hiarcs:} 18... Nc8 $142 19. b5 a5 20. O-O (20. Kf1
Nb6 21. Rh3 g6 22. Kg1 gxh5 23. Rxh5 Be8 24. Rh6 Bg6 25. Nd4 Rhg8 $11) 20...
Nb6 21. Ra2 h6 22. Be2 Rhg8 23. Rc1 g5 24. hxg6 Rxg6 25. g3 h5 $132) (18... h6
$142 19. O-O Nc8 20. b5 a5 21. Be2 Nb6 22. Nd4 Rhg8 23. Qg3 Qg5 24. Qxg5 hxg5
$11) ({Deep Hiarcs and Deep Rybka::} 18... Be8 $142 19. Qg5 ({Deep Hiarcs:} 19.
b5) 19... Qxg5 20. Nxg5 Nc6 21. Nf3 g6 22. hxg6 Bxg6 23. Bxg6 hxg6 24. Ke2 b5
25. axb5 axb5 $11) 19. bxc5 $14 ({Analysis:Deep Hiarcs and Deep Rybka:} 19.
Qxc5 $142 Qxc5 20. bxc5 Rf4 21. Kd2 Nc6 (21... Rg4 22. Rhb1 (22. g3 Rf8 23. Ke3
Rc8 24. Nd4 Rxc5 25. Kf3 Rxc3 $5 26. Kxg4 Rxd3 27. Rad1 Rc3) 22... a5 23. g3
Rf8 24. Ke3 Rc8 $14) 22. Ke3 Rhf8 23. Rh3 Rg4 $16) 19... Rc8 {
Threatening to regain her pawn via either ...Rxc5 or ...Qxc5.} ({
Analysis:Deep Rybka:} 19... Rc8 20. Rb1 Ka8 21. Rh4 Nc6 22. Rb6 Rhf8 23. Rh3 h6
24. Kf1 Na5 25. Rg3 Rg8 $14) 20. Rb1 {
Kosteniuk creates the threat of 21.Bxa6 winning a pawn.} Qxc5 $6 {Offering to
exchange queens.which would simply the position, however, this idea allows
Kosteniuk to win Cramling's a-pawn.} ({Analysis:Deep Rybka and Deep Hiarcs:}
20... Ka8 $142 21. c4 ({Deep Hiarcs:} 21. Rh4 Qxc5 22. Qxc5 Rxc5 23. Rg4 g6 24.
hxg6 hxg6 25. Kd2 Rcc8) 21... Rxc5 (21... Qxc5 22. cxd5 Qxe3+ 23. fxe3 exd5 24.
Rh4 Nc6 25. Rf4 Rhe8 $14) 22. cxd5 exd5 23. Nd4 Nc6 24. Nxc6 Bxc6 25. Qd4 Rc8
$14) 21. Qxc5 Rxc5 22. Bxa6 $14 Rc7 $6 ({
Analysis:Deep Hiarcs and Deep Rybka:Better is} 22... Bc8 $142 23. Kd2 Ra5 24.
Bd3 (24. Bb5 Nxb5 25. axb5 Ra2+ (25... Bd7 $143 26. h6 g6 27. Ng5 Ra4 (27...
Bxb5 28. Ra1 Rxa1 29. Rxa1 Bd7 $16 (29... Rf8 $18)))) 24... Rxa4 25. Rb4 Rxb4
26. cxb4 h6 $14) 23. Kd2 $16 {Deep Rybka evaluates that Kosteniuk has a
definite advantage in this position (+/-).} Bxa4 {Regaining material equality.}
({Analysis:} 23... Nc6 24. Bd3 h6 25. Rh4 Rf8 26. Rb3 Ka7 $16) 24. Rb4 {
Winning a tempo.} ({Analysis:Deep Hiarcs:} 24. Nd4 $142 Bd7 25. Bd3 Nc6 26. Nb5
Nxe5 $5 27. Nxc7 Kxc7 28. Be2 Rf8 29. f3 Bc6) ({Analysis:Deep Rybka:} 24. Rh4
$142 Bc6 25. Bd3 Re7 26. Ra1 Bd7 27. Rf4 Be8 28. g4 Nc6 $14) 24... Bd7 {
The lost tempo.} 25. Rhb1 {
Creating the threat of 26.Rxb7 which would be decisive.} Bc8 $6 ({
Analysis:Deep Hiarcs and Deep Rybka:} 25... b5 $142 26. Rf4 Be8 27. Nd4 Re7 28.
g4 (28. Ke3 Rc7 29. Rb3 h6 30. g4 Ka8 31. Kd2 (31. Nxe6 $2 Rc6 32. Nxg7 Rxa6
33. Nxe8 Rxe8) 31... Re7) 28... Kc7 29. Nxb5+ Bxb5 30. Bxb5 Rb8 31. Rfb4 Nxb5
32. Rxb5 Rxb5 33. Rxb5 Rf7 $16 {
And Cramling would have insufficient compensation for the pawn.}) 26. Nd4 {
Threatening Nxe6} Re8 27. f4 ({Analysis:Deep Hiarcs:} 27. Rb6 g6 28. hxg6 hxg6
29. f4 Rg7 30. c4 g5 31. g3 gxf4 32. gxf4 dxc4 33. Bxc4 Rd7 $18) 27... Ree7 28.
Rb6 h6 29. g3 Re8 30. Rd6 ({Analysis:Deep Hiarcs:} 30. R1b4 Ka8 31. Be2 Rc5 32.
c4 Nc6 33. Nxc6 Rxc6 34. cxd5 exd5 35. R6b5 Kb8) 30... Ree7 ({
Analysis:Deep Hiarcs:} 30... Ka8 $142 31. Bd3 Ree7 32. f5 exf5 33. e6 Re8 34.
Re1 Nc6 35. Nxf5 Kb8) 31. Bf1 ({Analysis:Deep Hiarcs:} 31. Be2 $142 Bd7 32. Bg4
Rc4 33. Rdb6 Bc8 34. R1b2 Ka8 35. Bh3 Kb8) 31... Bd7 ({Analysis:Deep Hiarcs:}
31... Re8 32. Bh3 Rce7 33. Kd3 Bd7 34. Rdb6 Bc8 35. c4 dxc4+ 36. Kxc4 Rd8 37.
Rd6 Rxd6 38. exd6 Re8) 32. Bh3 {
Creating a triple-attack against Cramling's e-pawn.} Nc8 $2 {
This move is a mistake because it allows Kosteniuk to play 33.Bxe6.} ({
Analysis:Deep Hiarcs and Deep Rybka:Better is} 32... Rc4 $142 33. f5 (33. Rdb6
Bc8 34. R1b2 Ka8 35. Rd6 Bd7 36. Nxe6 Nc8 37. Rxd7 $5 Rxd7 38. Bf1 Ne7 39. Nxg7
Ng8 40. Ne6 Rc8 $18) 33... exf5 34. e6 Bc6 35. Nxf5 Kc7 36. Nxe7 Kxd6 37. Nf5+
Kc7) 33. Bxe6 $5 {Allowing an exchange sacrifice.} Nxd6 ({Analysis:Deep Hiarcs:
} 33... Bxe6 $142 34. Rxe6 Rxe6 35. Nxe6 Rd7 36. Kd3 Re7 37. Nd4 Rf7 38. Nc6+
Kc7 39. Rxb7+ $1 Kxb7 40. Nd8+ Kc7 41. Nxf7 $18) 34. exd6 {Regaining a rook.}
Bxe6 $4 {A blunder.} ({Analysis:Deep Hiarcs:} 34... Rxe6 $142 35. dxc7+ Kxc7
36. Nxe6+ Bxe6 37. Ra1 Bg4 38. Ra8 Bxh5 39. Rh8 Bf3 $18) 35. dxe7 Bd7 (35...
Bf7 36. Nf5 Bxh5 37. Nxg7 Bg6 38. Re1 Bf7 39. f5 Ka7 $18) (35... Rxe7 $4 36.
Nc6+ Kc7 37. Nxe7 $18) 36. Nf5 {
Threatening 37.Re1 or 37.Nxg7 so Cramling resigned.} 1-0

Women's World Chess Championships:Semi-finals

The World Women's Chess Championship has reached the semi-final stage. In dramatic fashion, both games of the sem-final ended in wins for one of the players, Alexandra Kosteniuk defeated Pia Cramling, and Hou Yifan defeated Humpy Koneru. Here are the moves played in each of the first games in PGN format:

[Event "WCh-Women"]
[Site "Nalchik RUS"]
[Date "2008.09.10"]
[Round "5.1"]
[White "Kosteniuk,A"]
[Black "Cramling,P"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2510"]
[BlackElo "2544"]
[EventDate "2008.08.29"]
[ECO "C10"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. e5 Ne4 6. Bd3 Bb4 7. Bd2 Nxd2 8.
Qxd2 f6 9. a3 Bxc3 10. Qxc3 fxe5 11. dxe5 Qe7 12. h4 Bd7 13. b4 a6 14. h5
O-O-O 15. Qd2 Kb8 16. c3 Rdf8 17. Qe3 Na7 18. a4 c5 19. bxc5 Rc8 20. Rb1
Qxc5 21. Qxc5 Rxc5 22. Bxa6 Rc7 23. Kd2 Bxa4 24. Rb4 Bd7 25. Rhb1 Bc8 26.
Nd4 Re8 27. f4 Ree7 28. Rb6 h6 29. g3 Re8 30. Rd6 Ree7 31. Bf1 Bd7 32. Bh3
Nc8 33. Bxe6 Nxd6 34. exd6 Bxe6 35. dxe7 Bd7 36. Nf5 1-0


[Event "WCh-Women"]
[Site "Nalchik RUS"]
[Date "2008.09.10"]
[Round "5.1"]
[White "Hou Yifan"]
[Black "Koneru,H"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2557"]
[BlackElo "2622"]
[EventDate "2008.08.29"]
[ECO "C95"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8.
c3 O-O 9. h3 Nb8 10. d4 Nbd7 11. Nbd2 Bb7 12. Bc2 c5 13. d5 g6 14. Nf1 Nh5
15. Bh6 Re8 16. b3 Bf8 17. Be3 Nb6 18. a4 bxa4 19. bxa4 Nc4 20. a5 Bc8 21.
N3d2 Nxa5 22. Ra3 Bd7 23. Qa1 Nb7 24. Rb1 Qc7 25. Rxa6 Rxa6 26. Qxa6 Nd8
27. Nc4 f5 28. Qb6 Qxb6 29. Nxb6 f4 30. Nxd7 fxe3 31. Nxe3 Bh6 32. g4 Re7
33. Ba4 Nf4 34. Rb8 Kg7 35. Rxd8 Rf7 36. Nd1 Nxh3+ 37. Kg2 Nf4+ 38. Kf1 Bg5
39. Rb8 Nd3 40. Rb6 Rf4 41. Bb5 Nxf2 42. Nxf2 Bh4 43. Rxd6 Rxf2+ 44. Kg1
Rf4 45. Nxe5 Rxe4 46. Rd7+ Kg8 47. Nf3 Rxg4+ 48. Kf1 Bf6 49. Rc7 g5 50.
Rxc5 Rf4 51. Kg2 g4 52. Nd4 h5 53. Rc8+ Kf7 54. d6 h4 55. Be8+ 1-0

These results mean that Cramling and Koneru must both win the second game of their respective matches to force a playoff.

Monday, September 8, 2008

Women's World Chess Championship:Round 4 Game 2

Here are the results from the second game of these matches:

Round 4 Game 2 (September 7, 2008)
Cramling, Pia - Stefanova, Antoaneta ½-½ 49 D43 Anti-Meran Gambit
Hou Yifan - Mkrtchian, Lilit 1-0 38 B13 Caro Kann Exchange
Shen Yang - Koneru, Humpy 0-1 42 D31 Semi-Slav Defence
Ushenina, Anna - Kosteniuk, Alexandra 0-1 26 E35 Nimzo Indian 4.Qc2

These results mean the following match standings exist: Kosteniuk,Koneru,Yifan and Cramling make it through to the semi-finals:

WCh-Women Nalchik (RUS), 28 viii - 18 ix 2008
Round 4 Results 8th-10th September 2008.
NAT Name Rtng G1 G2 Rp1 Rp2 Bz1 Bz2 SD Total
Round 4 Match 01
RUS Kosteniuk, Aleksandra 2510½1




UKR Ushenina, Anna 2476½0




½
Round 4 Match 02
IND Koneru, Humpy 262211




2
CHN Shen, Yang 244500




0
Round 4 Match 03
ARM Mkrtchian, Lilit 2436½0




½
CHN Hou, Yifan 2557½1




Round 4 Match 04
BUL Stefanova, Antoaneta 25500½




½
SWE Cramling, Pia 25441½






Here are the pairings for the Semi-Finals: These matches should be extremely close and entertaining in my opinion:

Round 5


Name Rtng G1 G2 Rp1 Rp2 Bz1 Bz2 SD Total

Round 5 Match 01
RUS
Kosteniuk, Aleksandra 2510







SWE
Cramling, Pia 2544








Round 5 Match 02
CHN
Hou, Yifan 2557







IND
Koneru, Humpy 2622








Cramling and Kosteniuk have played one game against each other in their professional chess careers, the game occurred in the FIDE World Cup in 2000 and Cramling won in 106 moves! Yifan and Koneru have also played one game against each other at Corus 2008, the game was drawn in 54 moves:

[Event "FIDE World Cup-C (Women)"]
[Site "Shenyang"]
[Date "2000.08.01"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Cramling,Pia"]
[Black "Kosteniuk,Alexandra"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Eco "A87"]
1.d4 f5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.Nf3 Bg7 5.0-0 0-0 6.b3 d6 7.Bb2 Qe8 8.c4 Na6
9.Qc2 Rb8 10.Nbd2 b5 11.Rfe1 Kh8 12.a3 bxc4 13.Qxc4 Qb5 14.Qxb5 Rxb5 15.e3 Ne4 16.Rab1 Nxd2
17.Nxd2 c5 18.Bf1 Rb6 19.Bc3 Rb8 20.Rbc1 Bb7 21.Nc4 cxd4 22.Bxd4 Nc5 23.Bxg7+ Kxg7 24.Na5 Be4
25.b4 Ne6 26.Be2 Rbc8 27.f3 Ba8 28.Kf2 Kf6 29.Ba6 Rc7 30.Rxc7 Nxc7 31.Be2 Rb8 32.Rc1 Ne6
33.Bd1 g5 34.Bb3 g4 35.f4 Bf3 36.h4 Be4 37.Bd1 Ba8 38.Be2 Be4 39.Rc3 h6 40.Bf1 Bf3
41.Bd3 Ba8 42.Nb3 Bd5 43.Nd4 Nxd4 44.exd4 Be4 45.Ba6 Rb6 46.Bf1 Bc6 47.Ke3 e6 48.Bc4 Ke7
49.d5 exd5 50.Bd3 Ke6 51.Kd4 Bb5 52.Bc2 Bc4 53.Re3+ Kf6 54.Ba4 a5 55.bxa5 Ra6 56.Bc2 Rxa5
57.a4 Rc5 58.Ra3 Ra5 59.Ra1 Ke6 60.Re1+ Kf7 61.Rb1 Ke6 62.Rb8 Ba2 63.Rh8 Rc5 64.Rxh6+ Ke7
65.Bxf5 Rc4+ 66.Ke3 d4+ 67.Kf2 Rxa4 68.Bxg4 Bc4 69.Rh7+ Kf6 70.Rh6+ Ke7 71.f5 Ra2+ 72.Kf3 d3
73.f6+ Kf8 74.Bh5 Kg8 75.f7+ Bxf7 76.Bxf7+ Kxf7 77.Rxd6 Ra3 78.Kg4 Ke7 79.Rd4 Ke6 80.h5 Ke5
81.Rd8 Ra4+ 82.Kf3 Kf6 83.Rxd3 Ra5 84.Kg4 Ra4+ 85.Kh3 Ra5 86.Kh4 Ra1 87.Rd6+ Kg7 88.g4 Ra5
89.Rd7+ Kg8 90.h6 Rb5 91.g5 Rb6 92.Kh5 Rb5 93.Re7 Ra5 94.Kg6 Ra6+ 95.Kf5 Ra1 96.g6 Rf1+
97.Ke6 Re1+ 98.Kd7 Rd1+ 99.Kc6 Rc1+ 100.Kd5 Rd1+ 101.Kc4 Rc1+ 102.Kd3 Rd1+ 103.Kc2 Rd8 104.Kc3 Kf8
105.Rc7 Kg8 106.Kc4 1-0



:[Event "Corus-B"]
[Site "Wijk aan Zee"]
[Date "2008.01.12"]
[Round "10"]
[White "Hou,Yifan"]
[Black "Koneru,Humpy"]
[Result "1/2"]
[Eco "C87"]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 d6 7.c3 Bg4 8.d3 Nd7
9.Be3 h6 10.Nbd2 Bg5 11.h3 Bh5 12.d4 Bxe3 13.fxe3 0-0 14.Nf1 b5 15.Bc2 Nb6 16.Ng3 Bg6
17.Nf5 Re8 18.b3 Bxf5 19.exf5 d5 20.e4 Qd6 21.f6 exd4 22.cxd4 Qxf6 23.e5 Qe7 24.Qd3 g6
25.e6 f5 26.Qd2 Qf6 27.Rac1 Rxe6 28.Rxe6 Qxe6 29.Qxh6 Re8 30.Bxf5 gxf5 31.Rxc6 Qxh6 32.Rxh6 Re2 33.Rc6 a5 34.Rxc7 Rxa2 35.Rb7 Nc8 36.Rb8 Rc2 37.Rxb5 Ne7 38.Rxa5 f4 39.Rc5 Rb2 40.Rc3 Nf5 41.Rd3 Rb1+ 42.Kf2 Ng3 43.Nd2 Rd1 44.Kf3 Ne4 45.Kxf4 Nxd2 46.Ke3 Nf1+ 47.Ke2 Rb1 48.g4 Kg7 49.Kf2 Kg6 50.Kg2 Kg5 51.Rf3 Nd2 52.Rf5+ Kg6 53.Rxd5 Rxb3 54.Rf5 1/2

Sunday, September 7, 2008

Woman's World Chess Championship:Round 4 Game 1

The first games in the quarter-finals of the Woman's World Chess Championship were played today in Nalchik, Russia. Here are the results:

Round 4 Game 1 (September 7, 2008)
Stefanova, Antoaneta - Cramling, Pia 0-1 54 D10 Slav Defence
Mkrtchian, Lilit - Hou Yifan ½-½ 28 E12 Queens Indian Petrosian
Koneru, Humpy - Shen Yang 1-0 31 D11 Slav Defence
Kosteniuk, Alexandra - Ushenina, Anna ½-½ 67 B12 Caro Kann Advanced

I find it surprising that Stefanova decided to play a Queen's Gambit against Cramling,because Stefanova has been playing the Trompowsky Attack in tournaments alot of the time, when she has the White pieces. The pressure is really on Stefanova now,due to the fact that she lost with the White pieces.


WCh-Women Nalchik (RUS), 28 viii - 18 ix 2008
Round 4 Results 8th-10th September 2008.
NAT Name Rtng G1 G2 Rp1 Rp2 Bz1 Bz2 SD Total
Round 4 Match 01
RUS Kosteniuk, Aleksandra 2510½
½
UKR Ushenina, Anna 2476½
½
Round 4 Match 02
IND Koneru, Humpy 26221
1
CHN Shen, Yang 24450
0
Round 4 Match 03
ARM Mkrtchian, Lilit 2436½
½
CHN Hou, Yifan 2557½
½
Round 4 Match 04
BUL Stefanova, Antoaneta 25500
0
SWE Cramling, Pia 25441
1

Comparison of the players

In the Woman's World Chess Championship, it is interesting to examine the past history of the players based upon their previous encounters with their opponents in the quarter-finals. According to the online database at chessbase.com:

(a)Alexandra Kosteniuk and Anna Ushenina have only faced each other over the chessboard once in their careers. The game took place in the 2001 European Woman's Rapid chess championship and Kosteniuk won that game.

(b)In the next match, Yan Sheng plays Humpy Koneru. I appears that these two players have never faced each other over the board before.

(c)In the third match, Lilit Mkrtchian plays Yifan Hou. These two players have faced each other twice over the board before with Mkrtchian winning with the white pieces in one game, and Yifan winning with the Black pieces in the other (2006 and 2007).

(d)In the fourth match, GM Pia Cramling of Sweden faces GM Antoaneta Stefanova of Bulgaria. Both players hold the "Men's" GM title. This match should be very close and very interesting to watch as the two players are only by 6 elo points in rating (Stefanova has a 2550 elo and Cramling's elo is 2544). The Chessbase online database indicates that these two players have faced each other 4 times over-the-b9ard before, with Stefanova holding the edge with 2 wins, 1 loss and two draws (both of Stefanova's wins came when she was playing the black pieces).Stefanova has exhibited a tendency to play the Trompowsky Opening with White ie. 1.d4 d5 2.Bg5 or 1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5, however in this year she has played the moves 1.e4. 1.d4, 1.Nf3 and 1.c4 to begin the game with the White pieces.This will make it difficult to prepare her openings for this match, although Cramling usually plays a Slav defense or Semi-Slav defense against the Queen's Gambit, and the Sicilian Defense against 1.e4.

Good luck to all of the competitors in these quarterfinal matches. I hope the games are exciting and well-played!

My predictions:
I predict that Kosteniuk,Koneru,Hou Yifan, and Cramling will win their matches and advance to the semi-finals.

FIDE Women's World Chess Championship:Round 3 update

Results of playoffs held in round 3:

(a)Yang Shen of China defeated Nadezhda Kosintseva of the Republic of Russia by a score of 2.5-1.5 in the playoff round to win her match by a final score of 3.5-2.5. Shen therefore moves into round 4 while Kosintseva is eliminated from further play (The two players had split the rapid chess games in the playoff and Shen proceeded to win both blitz games to advance to round 4).

(b)Hou Yifan of China defeated Elena Sedina of Italy by a score of 2-0 in the playoff round to win her match by a score of 3-1. Yifan moves into round 4 and Sedina is eliminated from the competition. (The two players had split their two games using regular time control to force a playoff).
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Round 4 matches
------------------
Here are the pairings for the round 4 matches (quarter-finals) in the Women's World Chess Championship:


Name Rtng G1 G2 Rp1 Rp2 Bz1 Bz2 SD Total
Round 4 Match 01
RUS
Kosteniuk, Aleksandra 2510


UKR
Ushenina, Anna 2476


Round 4 Match 02
IND
Koneru, Humpy 2622


CHN
Shen, Yang 2445


Round 4 Match 03
ARM
Mkrtchian, Lilit 2436


CHN
Hou, Yifan 2557


Round 4 Match 04
BUL
Stefanova, Antoaneta 2550


SWE
Cramling, Pia 2544


Saturday, September 6, 2008

FIDE Women's World Chess Championship:Round 3

The first two games of all the matches from round 3 of the Women's World Chess Championship have been played.Ushenina and Stefanova won both games in their respective matches against Matveeva and Gaponenko to move into round 4 Four other players won their matches by scores of 1.5- .5: Koneru won her match against Hoang, Cramling won over Ruan, Mkrtchian won over Harika and Kosteniuk won over Tatiana Kosintseva. Yang Shen is tied in her match with Tatiana's sister, Nadezhda by a score of 1-1 (two draws).

The other two matches are tied at 1 game each (1-1) After going through the first two rounds undefeated, Yifan Hou of China suffered her first loss of a game in round 3 (to Elena Sedina of Italy).

Saturday is a day when Shen and Nadezhdza Kosintseva, and Yifan Hou and Elena Sedina will play tie-break games to see which two players advance to round four of the Championship.

Round 3

Name Rtng G1 G2 Rp1 Rp2 Bz1 Bz2 SD Total
Round 3 Match 01
RUS
Matveeva, Svetlana 2412
0
0
0
UKR
Ushenina, Anna 2476
1
1
2
Round 3 Match 02
HUN
Hoang Thanh Trang 2487
½
0
0.5
IND
Koneru, Humpy 2622
½
1
1.5
Round 3 Match 03
CHN
Hou, Yifan 2557
1
0
1
ITA
Sedina, Elena 2344
0
1
1
Round 3 Match 04
UKR
Gaponenko, Inna 2468
0
0
0
BUL
Stefanova, Antoaneta 2550
1
1
2
Round 3 Match 05
SWE
Cramling, Pia 2544
1
½
1.5
CHN
Ruan, Lufei 2499
0
½
0.5
Round 3 Match 06
IND
Harika, Dronavalli 2461
½
0
0.5
ARM
Mkrtchian, Lilit 2436
½
1
1.5
Round 3 Match 07
CHN
Shen, Yang 2445
½
½
1
RUS
Kosintseva, Nadezhda 2460
½
½
1
Round 3 Match 08
RUS
Kosteniuk, Aleksandra 2510
½
1
1.5
RUS
Kosintseva, Tatjana 2511
½
0
0.5

Tuesday, September 2, 2008

FIDE Womens World Chess Championship:Round 2

Here are the results from round two of the FIDE Women's Chess Championships.There will be a new FIDE Women's Chess Champion crowned in this championship as reigning WC Yuhua Xu of China was defeated in her round two match by Svetlana Matveeva of the Republic of Russia. GM Humpy Koneru won her match by default so she gains a spot in round 3 without breaking a sweat.However, you have to wonder if this will not hurt her in the next round, having not had to face an opponent in the first two rounds of play. GM Stefanova is in a dog fight to secure a place in the next round as she has only been able to draw her first two games in round two with lower-rated Wenjun Ju of China (In December 2004, Ju came joint second in the Asian Women's Chess Championship and in October 2007, she came joint fourth in the 2007 China Women's Zonal 3.5 Tournament in Tianjin.) Here are the results from the games played so far in round 2:

Round 2

Name Rtng G1 G2 Rp1 Rp2 Bz1 Bz2 SD Total
Round 2 Match 01
RUS Matveeva, Svetlana 2412
1
½
1.5
CHN Xu, Yuhua 2483
0
½
0.5
Round 2 Match 02
IND Koneru, Humpy 2622
+
+
2
-
-
0
Round 2 Match 03
MGL Mongontuul, Bathuyang 2406
0
0
0
CHN Hou, Yifan 2557
1
1
2
Round 2 Match 04
BUL Stefanova, Antoaneta 2550
½
½
1
CHN Ju, Wenjun 2389
½
½
1
Round 2 Match 05
CHN Tan, Zongyi 2387
½
0
0.5
SWE Cramling, Pia 2544
½
1
1.5
Round 2 Match 06
POL Gasik, Anna 2211
½
0
0.5
ARM Mkrtchian, Lilit 2436
½
1
1.5
Round 2 Match 07
CHN Shen, Yang 2445
1
½
1.5
CHN Zhao, Xue 2522
0
½
0.5
Round 2 Match 08
RUS Kosintseva, Tatjana 2511
1
½
1.5
USA Zatonskih, Anna 2446
0
½
0.5
Round 2 Match 09
-
-
0
RUS Kosteniuk, Aleksandra 2510
+
+
2
Round 2 Match 10
LTU Chmilyte, Viktorija 2508
½
½
1
RUS Kosintseva, Nadezhda 2460
½
½
1
Round 2 Match 11
IND Harika, Dronavalli 2461
½
½
1
SLO Muzychuk, Anna 2504
½
½
1
Round 2 Match 12
CHN Ruan, Lufei 2499
½
1
1.5
ARG Amura, Claudia 2345
½
0
0.5
Round 2 Match 13
UKR Gaponenko, Inna 2468
1
0
1
USA Rohonyan, Katerine 2321
0
1
1
Round 2 Match 14
VIE Nguyen, Thi Thanh An 2323
½
½
1
ITA Sedina, Elena 2344
½
½
1
Round 2 Match 15
POL Socko, Monika 2473
½
0
0.5
HUN Hoang Thanh Trang 2487
½
1
1.5
Round 2 Match 16
GER Paehtz, Elisabeth 2481
0
½
0.5
UKR Ushenina, Anna 2476
1
½
1.5

Source:http://nalchik2008.fide.com/results/?lang=eng&id=39

Visit GM Alexandra Kosteniuk's Women's Chess Blog:Please click on the image below:

Visit GM Alexandra Kosteniuk's Women's Chess Blog:Please click on the image below:
Chess needs more women and girl participants and administrators!

Thoughts worth thinking about

"Our subconscious minds have no sense of humor, play no jokes and cannot tell the difference between reality and an imagined thought or image. What we continually think about eventually will manifest in our lives."-Sidney Madwed



Laws alone can not secure freedom of expression; in order that every woman and man present their views without penalty, there must be spirit of tolerance in the entire population.- Albert Einstein Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. - Leo Buscaglia



A person's true wealth is the good he or she does in the world. - Mohammed



Our task must be to free ourselves... by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty. -Albert Einstein



The best way to find yourself, is to lose yourself in the service of others. - Ghandi



The unselfish effort to bring cheer to others will be the beginning of a happier life for ourselves. - Helen Keller



Aim for success, not perfection. Never give up your right to be wrong, because then you will lose the ability to learn new things and move forward with your life. Remember that fear always lurks behind perfectionism. Confronting your fears and allowing yourself the right to be human can, paradoxically, make yourself a happier and more productive person. - Dr. David M. Burns



Life is as dear to a mute creature as it is to man. Just as one wants happiness and fears pain, just as one wants to live and not die, so do other creatures. -His Holiness The Dalai Lama



Mankind's true moral test, its fundamental test (which lies deeply buried from view), consists of its attitude towards those who are at its mercy: animals. And in this respect mankind has suffered a fundamental debacle, a debacle so fundamental that all others stem from it. -



Milan Kundera, The Unbearable Lightness of Being



The worst sin towards our fellow creatures is not to hate them, but to be indifferent to them. That's the essence of inhumanity. -George Bernard Shaw

Ego's trick is to make us lose sight of our interdependence. That kind of ego-thought gives us a perfect justification to look out only for ourselves. But that is far from the truth. In reality we all depend on each other and we have to help each other. The husband has to help his wife, the wife has to help the husband, the mother has to help her children, and the children are supposed to help the parents too, whether they want to or not.-Gehlek Rinpoche Source: "The Best Buddhist Writing 2005 pg. 165

The hostile attitude of conquering nature ignores the basic interdependence of all things and events---that the world beyond the skin is actually an extension of our own bodies---and will end in destroying the very environment from which we emerge and upon which our whole life depends.